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Showing posts with label Avant-Garde Jazz. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Avant-Garde Jazz. Show all posts

Friday, March 23, 2012

The Legendary Max Roach



Born: January 10, 1925 | Died: August 16, 2007 Instrument: Drums

Maxwell Lemuel Roach is a percussionist, drummer, and jazz composer. He has worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Sonny Rollins. He is widely considered to be one of the most important drummers in the history of jazz.

Roach was born in Newland, North Carolina, to Alphonse and Cressie Roach; his family moved to Brooklyn, New York when he was 4 years old. He grew up in a musical context, his mother being a gospel singer, and he started to play bugle in parade orchestras at a young age. At the age of 10, he was already playing drums in some gospel bands. He performed his first big-time gig in New York City at the age of sixteen, substituting for Sonny Greer in a performance with the Duke Ellington Orchestra.



In 1942, Roach started to go out in the jazz clubs of the 52nd Street and at 78th Street & Broadway for Georgie Jay's Taproom (playing with schoolmate Cecil Payne). He was one of the first drummers (along with Kenny Clarke) to play in the bebop style, and performed in bands led by Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, Bud Powell, and Miles Davis.

Roach played on many of Parker's most important records, including the Savoy 1945 session, a turning point in recorded jazz.

Two children, son Daryl and daughter Maxine, were born from his first marriage with Mildred Roach. In 1954 he met singer Barbara Jai (Johnson) and had another son, Raoul Jordu.



He continued to play as a freelance while studying composition at the Manhattan School of Music. He graduated in 1952.

During the period 1962-1970, Roach was married to the singer Abbey Lincoln, who had performed on several of Roach's albums. Twin daughters, Ayodele and Dara Rasheeda, were later born to Roach and his third wife, Janus Adams Roach.

Long involved in jazz

education, in 1972 he joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

In the early 2000s, Roach became less active owing to the onset of hydrocephalus-related complications.

Renowned all throughout his performing life, Roach has won an extraordinary array of honors. He was one of the first to be given a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, cited as a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters in France, twice awarded the French Grand Prix du Disque, elected to the International Percussive Society's Hall of Fame and the Downbeat Magazine Hall of Fame, awarded Harvard Jazz Master, celebrated by Aaron Davis Hall, given eight honorary doctorate degrees, including degrees awarded by the University of Bologna, Italy and Columbia University.



In 1952 Roach co-founded Debut Records with bassist Charles Mingus. This label released a record of a concert, billed and widely considered as “the greatest concert ever,” called Jazz at Massey Hall, featuring Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Mingus and Roach. Also released on this label was the groundbreaking bass-and- drum free improvisation, Percussion Discussion.

In 1954, he formed a quintet featuring trumpeter Clifford Brown, tenor saxophonist Harold Land, pianist Richie Powell (brother of Bud Powell), and bassist George Morrow, though Land left the following year and Sonny Rollins replaced him. The group was a prime example of the hard bop style also played by Art Blakey and Horace Silver. Tragically, this group was to be short-lived; Brown and Powell were killed in a car accident on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in June 1956. After Brown and Powell's deaths, Roach continued leading a similarly configured group, with Kenny Dorham (and later the short-lived Booker Little) on trumpet, George Coleman on tenor and pianist Ray Bryant. Roach expanded the standard form of hard-bop using 3/4 waltz rhythms and modality in 1957 with his album Jazz in 3/4 time. During this period, Roach recorded a series of other albums for the EmArcy label featuring the brothers Stanley and Tommy Turrentine.



In 1960 he composed the “We Insist! - Freedom Now” suite with lyrics by Oscar Brown Jr., after being invited to contribute to commemorations of the hundredth anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Using his musical abilities to comment on the African-American experience would be a significant part of his career. Unfortunately, Roach suffered from being blacklisted by the American recording industry for a period in the 1960s. In 1966 with his album Drums Unlimited (which includes several tracks that are entirely drums solos) he proved that drums can be a solo instrument able to play theme, variations, rhythmically cohesive phrases. He described his approach to music as “the creation of organized sound.”

Among the many important records Roach has made is the classic Money Jungle 1962, with Mingus and Duke Ellington. This is generally regarded as one of the very finest trio albums ever made.

During the 70s, Roach formed a unique musical organization--”M'Boom”--a percussion orchestra. Each member of this unit composed for it and performed on many percussion instruments. Personnel included Fred King, Joe Chambers, Warren Smith, Freddie Waits, Roy Brooks, Omar Clay, Ray Mantilla, Francisco Mora, and Eli Fountain.

Not content to expand on the musical territory he had already become known for, Roach spent the decades of the 80s and 90s continually finding new ways to express his musical expression and presentation.



In the early 80s, he began presenting entire concerts solo, proving that this multi-percussion instrument, in the hands of such a great master, could fulfill the demands of solo performance and be entirely satisfying to an audience. He created memorable compositions in these solo concerts; a solo record was released by Bay State, a Japanese label, just about impossible to obtain. One of these solo concerts is available on video, which also includes a filming of a recording date for Chattahoochee Red, featuring his working quartet, Odean Pope, Cecil Bridgewater and Calvin Hill.

He embarked on a series of duet recordings. Departing from the style of presentation he was best known for, most of the music on these recordings is free improvisation, created with the avant-garde musicians Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Archie Shepp, Abdullah Ibrahim and Connie Crothers. He created duets with other performers: a recorded duet with the oration by Martin Luther King, “I Have a Dream”; a duet with video artist Kit Fitzgerald, who improvised video imagery while Roach spontaneously created the music; a classic duet with his life-long friend and associate Dizzy Gillespie; a duet concert recording with Mal Waldron.



He wrote music for theater, such as plays written by Sam Shepard, presented at La Mama E.T.C. in New York City.

He found new contexts for presentation, creating unique musical ensembles. One of these groups was “The Double Quartet.” It featured his regular performing quartet, with personnel as above, except Tyrone Brown replacing Hill; this quartet joined with “The Uptown String Quartet,” led by his daughter Maxine Roach, featuring Diane Monroe, Lesa Terry and Eileen Folson.

Another ensemble was the “So What Brass Quintet,” a group comprised of five brass instrumentalists and Roach, no chordal instrumnent, no bass player. Much of the performance consisted of drums and horn duets. The ensemble consisted of two trumpets, trombone, French horn and tuba. Musicians included Cecil Bridgewater, Frank Gordon, Eddie Henderson, Steve Turre, Delfeayo Marsalis, Robert Stewart, Tony Underwood, Marshall Sealy, and Mark Taylor.



Roach presented his music with orchestras and gospel choruses. He performed a concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He wrote for and performed with the Walter White gospel choir and the John Motley Singers. Roach performed with dancers: the Alvin Aily Dance Company, the Dianne McIntyre Dance Company, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.

In the early 80s, Roach surprised his fans by performing in a hip hop concert, featuring the artist-rapper Fab Five Freddy and the New York Break Dancers. He expressed the insight that there was a strong kinship between the outpouring of expression of these young black artists and the art he had pursued all his life.

During all these years, while he ventured into new territory during a lifetime of innovation, he kept his contact with his musical point of origin. His last recording, “Friendship”, was with trumpet master Clark Terry, the two long-standing friends in duet and quartet.

Link to Article: All About Jazz

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Discography
As leader

  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet (Fantasy)
  • 1953 : Max Roach and his Sextet (Debut)
  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet featuring Hank Mobley (Debut)
  • 1956 : Max Roach + 4 (EmArcy)
  • 1957 : Jazz in ¾ Time
  • 1957-60 : Conte Candoli & Max Roach - Drummin' The Blues & Jazz Structures
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Art Blakey (with Art Blakey)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four at Newport (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four on the Chicago Scene (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max!
  • 1958 : Max Roach with the Boston Percussion Ensemble (EmArcy)
  • 1958 : Deeds not Words (aka Conversation) (Riverside)
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Bud Shank - Sessions (with Bud Shank)
  • 1958 : The Defiant Ones (with Booker Little)
  • 1958 : Deeds, Not Words (with all new cast Ray Draper, Booker Little, George Coleman)
  • 1959 : Rich Versus Roach (with Buddy Rich)
  • 1959 : A Little Sweet (aka. The Many Sides of Max ) (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Award-Winning Drummer (Time T)
  • 1960 : We Insist! (Candid)
  • 1960 : Max Roach + 4 - As Quiet As Kept
  • 1961 : Percussion Bitter Sweet (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1962 : Speak, Brother, Speak!
  • 1962 : It's Time (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1964 : The Max Roach Trio Featuring the Legendary Hasaan (with Hasaan ibn Ali)
  • 1966 : Drums Unlimited (Atlantic) (Leader, with James Spaulding, Freddie Hubbard, Ronnie Mathews, Jymie Merritt, Roland Alexander)
  • 1968 : Sound as Roach (Atlantic)
  • 1968 : Members, Don't Git Weary (Atlantic
  • 1971 : Lift Every Voice and Sing (with J.C. White Singers)
  • 1976 : Force: Sweet Mao-Suid Afrika '76 (duo with Archie Shepp)
  • 1976 : Percussion Discussion (with Art Blakey)
  • 1976 : Nommo (Victor)
  • 1977 : The Loudstar (Horo)
  • 1977 : Solos (Baystate)
  • 1977 : Streams of Consciousness - duo with Dollar Brand
  • 1978 : Confirmation (Fluid Records)
  • 1978 : Birth and Rebirth - duo with Anthony Braxton (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : The Long March - duo with Archie Shepp (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Historic Concerts - duo with Cecil Taylor (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : One in Two - Two in One - duo with Anthony Braxton (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Pictures in a Frame (Soul Note)
  • 1980 : Chattahoochee Red (Columbia)
  • 1982 : Swish - duo with Connie Crothers (New Artists)
  • 1982 : In the Light (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Scott Free (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : It's Christmas Again (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Survivors (Soul Note)
  • 1985 : Easy Winners (Soul Note)
  • 1986 : Bright Moments (Soul Note)
  • 1989 : Max + Dizzy: Paris 1989 - duo with Dizzy Gillespie (A&M)
  • 1991 : To the Max! (Enja)
  • 1995 : Max Roach With The New Orchestra Of Boston And The So What Brass Quintet (Blue Note)
  • 1999 : Beijing Trio (Asian Improv)
  • 2002 : Friendship - with Clark Terry) (Columbia)

With Clifford Brown

  • 1954 : Brown And Roach Incorporated
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach
  • 1954 : Jam Session
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Original Master Recording)
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown & The Max Roach Quartet - Historic California Concert
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Mainstream-Audiofidelity Japan)
  • 1954 : Study in Brown
  • 1954 : More Study in Brown
  • 1955 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1956 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street
  • 1957 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1979 : Live at the Bee Hive (Columbia Records)

With M'Boom

  • 1973 : Re: Percussion (Strata-East Records)
  • 1979 : M'Boom (Columbia)
  • 1984 : Collage (Soul Note)
  • 1992 : Live at S.O.B.'s New York (Blue Moon Records)

Live Albums and Bootlegs
  • 1964 : Live in Europe: Freedom Now Suite (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Tokyo (Denon)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live In Amsterdam - It's Time (Baystate)
  • 1978 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Milan
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Anthony Braxton Live in Alassio
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Archie Shepp Live in Milan [info]
  • 1979 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Frankfurt
  • 1979 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Alassio
  • 1981 : D.Gillespie/J.Moody/M.Roach feat. WDR Big Band - Live in Moers "Charlie Parker Memorial Concert"
  • 1981 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Rome [info]
  • 1982 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Milan [info]
  • 1983 : Live at Vielharmonie (Soul Note)
  • 1990 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Berlin [info]

As sideman

  • 1944 : Rainbow Mist (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1944 : Coleman Hawkins and His All Stars (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1945 : Town Hall, New York, June 22, 1945 (with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker)
  • 1945 - 1948: The Complete Savoy Studio Recordings (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1946 : Mad Be Bop (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1946 : Opus BeBop (with Stan Getz)
  • 1946 : Savoy Jam Party (Don Byas Quartet)
  • 1946 : The Hawk Flies (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1947 : The Bud Powell Trip (with Bud Powell)
  • 1947 : Lullaby in Rhythm (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Charlie Parker on Dial (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Miles Davis - First Miles (with Charlie Parker and Miles Davis)
  • 1947 : Dexter Rides Again (with Dexter Gordon)
  • 1948 : The Band that Never Was (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird on 52nd Street (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird at the Roost (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Birth of the Cool (with Miles Davis)
  • 1949 - 1953: Charlie Parker – Complete Sessions on Verve (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Charlie Parker in France (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Genesis (with Sonny Stitt)
  • 1949 : The Stars of Modern Jazz at Carnegie Hall
  • 1950 : The McGhee-Navarro Sextet (with Howard McGhee)
  • 1951 : The Amazing Bud Powell (with Bud Powell)
  • 1951 : The George Wallington Trip and Septet (with George Wallington)
  • 1951 : Conception (with Miles Davis)
  • 1952 : New Faces, New Sounds (with Gil Melle)
  • 1952 : The Complete Genius (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1952 : The Quintet - Jazz At Massey Hall (Debut Records)
  • 1952 : Live at Rockland Palace (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : The Metronome All Starss. MGM (with Billy Eckstine)
  • 1953 : Chet Baker and Miles Davis with the Lighthouse All-Stars
  • 1953 : Mambo Jazz (with Joe Holiday)
  • 1953 : Yardbird: DC-53 (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : Cohn's Tones (with Al Cohn)
  • 1953 : Diz and Getz (with Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz)
  • 1954 : Dinah Jams Featuring Dinah Washington
  • 1955 : Relaxed Piano Moods (with Hazel Scott)
  • 1955 : Introducing Jimmy Cleveland And His All Stars (EmArcy)
  • 1955 : New Piano Expressions (with John Dennis)
  • 1955 : Herbie Nichols Trio (with Herbie Nichols)
  • 1955 : Work Time (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1955 : The Charles Mingus Quartet plus Max Roach (with Charles Mingus)
  • 1956 : Sonny Rollins Plus 4 (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Sonny Boy (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Introducing Johnny Griffin (with Johnny Griffin)
  • 1956 : The Magnificent Thad Jones (with Thad Jones)
  • 1956 : Brilliant Corners (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1956 : Tour de Force (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : The Music of George Gershwin: I Sing of Thee (with Joe Wilder)
  • 1956 : Rollins Plays for Bird (Sonny Rollins Quintet)
  • 1956 : Saxophone Colossus (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1957 : First Place (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1957 : Sonny Clark Trio
  • 1957 : Jazz Contrasts (with Kenny Dorham)
  • 1957 : Abby Lincoln - That's Him
  • 1958: Booker Little 4 and Max Roach (United Artist)
  • 1958 : Freedom Suite (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1958 : Shadow Waltz (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1959 : Moon-Faced and Starry-Eyed (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Aix En Providence (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1960 : Quiet as it's Kept (Mercury)
  • 1960 : Tommy Turrentine (with Tommy Turrentine)
  • 1960 : Stan 'The Man' Turrentine
  • 1960 : Again! (Affinity)
  • 1960 : Parisian Sketches (Mercury)
  • 1960 : We Insist! Freedom Now Suite (Candid)
  • 1960 : Long as You're Living (Enja)
  • 1960 : Uhuru Afrika (with Randy Weston)
  • 1960 : Sonny Clark Trio (with Sonny Clark)
  • 1961 : Straight Ahead (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1961 : Out Front (with Booker Little)
  • 1961 : Paris Blues (with Duke Ellington)
  • 1962 : Money Jungle (with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus)
  • 1962 : Drum Suite (with Slide Hampton)
  • 1966 : Stuttgart 1963 Concert (with Sonny Rollins
  • 1972 : Newport in New York ‘72 (Roach on 2 tracks only)
  • 1975 : The Bop Session (with Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, John Lewis, Hank Jones and Percy Heath)
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Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Alice Coltrane

For more than five decades, the Coltrane name remains at the forefront of modern music. It is lauded throughout the United States as well as internationally where it has received great acclaim. The musical offerings cover an eclectic variety of artistic expressions recorded on ABC Impulse, Warner Bros., and Impulse-Universal.

She was born and raised in the religious family of Solon and Anne McLeod in Detroit, Michigan, once hailed as a major musical capitol. Alice became interested in music and began her study of the piano at the age of seven. She consistently and diligently practiced and studied classical music. Subsequently, she enrolled in a more advanced study of the music of Rachmaninoff, Beethoven, Stravinsky and Tschaikowsky. She once said: "Classical music for me, was an extensive, technical study for many years. At that time, I discovered it to be a truly profound music with a highly intellectual ambiance. I will always appreciate it with a kind remembrance and great esteem. Subsequent to the completion of her studies, she said, "The classical artist must respectfully recreate the composer's meaning. Although, with jazz music, you are allowed to develop your own creativity, improvisation and expression. This greatly inspires me."

She graduated from high school with a scholarship to the Detroit Institute of Technology; however, her musical achievements began to echo throughout the city, to the extent that she played in many music halls, choirs and churches, for various occasions as weddings, funerals, and religious programs. Her skills and abilities were highly enhanced when she began playing piano and organ for the gospel choir, and for the junior and senior choirs at her church. In later years, she would further her musical attributes by including organ, harp and synthesizer to her accomplishments.

After moving to New York in the early sixties, Alice met and married John Coltrane, the great creator of avant-garde music and genius and master of the tenor and soprano saxophones. His parents were very spiritual, and dedicated to service in the church in which his father faithfully served. John's mother, Mrs. Alice Coltrane, Sr., was a fine singer. He was blessed to have them as his parents.

The innovative, futuristic sounds of the Coltrane musical heritage have set a new pace for modern music that sounded the unstruck chord throughout the world. And it resounded in the hearts of many people creating a legacy that will not soon be forgotten. The vision they shared became a bright effulgence from the lighthouse of polyphonic, ethereal, universal sound, bringing clarity and understanding of the music and enhancing appreciation of it to the people.



Discography
As a leader

  • A Monastic Trio (Impulse!, 1967)
  • Cosmic Music (Impulse!, 1966-68) with John Coltrane
  • Huntington Ashram Monastery (Impulse!, 1969)
  • Ptah, the El Daoud (Impulse!, 1970)
  • Journey in Satchidananda (Impulse!, 1970)
  • Universal Consciousness (Impulse!, 1972)
  • World Galaxy (1972)
  • Lord of Lords (1973)
  • John Coltrane: Infinity (1973)
  • Reflection on Creation and Space (a Five Year View) (1973)
  • Illuminations (1974) with Carlos Santana
  • Eternity (1975)
  • Radha-Krisna Nama Sankirtana (1976)
  • Transcendence (1977)
  • Transfiguration (1978)
  • Turiya Sings (1982)
  • Divine Songs (1987)
  • Infinite Chants (1990)
  • Glorious Chants (1995)
  • Priceless Jazz (1998)
  • The Music of Alice Coltrane: Astral Meditations (1999)
  • Translinear Light (2004)
  • The Impulse Story (2006)

As a sideperson
With John Coltrane
  • Live at the Village Vanguard Again! (Impulse!, 1966)
  • Live in Japan (Impulse!, 1966 [1973])
  • Stellar Regions (Impulse!, 1966)
  • Expression (Impulse!, 1967)
  • The Olatunji Concert: The Last Live Recording (Impulse!, 1967)

With Terry Gibbs
  • Terry Gibbs Plays Jewish Melodies in Jazztime (Mercury, 1963)
  • Hootenanny My Way (Mercury, 1963)
  • El Nutto (Limelight, 1964)

With Charlie Haden
  • Closeness (Horizon, 1976)

With Joe Henderson

  • The Elements (Milestone, 1973)

With McCoy Tyner
  • Extensions (Blue Note, 1970)
Live Albums
  • Alice Coltrane Live (1972)
  • Alice Coltrane Quartet Live In Warsaw (1987)

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Pharoah Sanders


Pharoah Sanders (born October 13, 1940) is a Grammy Award–winning American jazz saxophonist.
Saxophonist Ornette Coleman once described him as "probably the best tenor player in the world." Emerging from John Coltrane's groups of the mid-60s Sanders is known for his overblowing, harmonic, and multiphonic techniques on the saxophone, as well as his use of "sheets of sound." Sanders is an important figure in the development of free jazz; Albert Ayler famously said "Trane was the Father, Pharoah was the Son, I am the Holy Ghost.

Born Ferrell Sanders in Little Rock, Arkansas, he began his professional career playing tenor saxophone in Oakland, California. He moved to New York City in 1961 after playing with rhythm and blues bands. He received his nickname "Pharoah" from bandleader Sun Ra, with whom he was performing. After moving to New York, Sanders had been destitute: "He was often living on the streets, under straits, where ever he could find to stay, his clothes in tatters. Sun Ra gave him a place to stay, bought him a new pair of green pants with yellow stripes (which Sanders hated but had to have), encouraged him to use the name 'Pharoah', and gradually worked him into the band."
Sanders came to greater prominence playing with John Coltrane's band, starting in 1965, as Coltrane began adopting the avant-garde jazz of Albert Ayler, Ra and Cecil Taylor. Sanders first performed on Coltrane's Ascension (recorded in June 1965), then on their dual-tenor recording Meditations (recorded in November 1965). After this Sanders joined Coltrane's final quintet, usually performing very lengthy, dissonant solos. Coltrane's later style was strongly influenced by Sanders. Amiri Baraka lays claim naming him Pharoah in an early sixties Downbeat review[citation needed] upon hearing him introduce himself as Farrell Sanders and thinking he said "Pharaoh Sanders."
Although Sanders' voice developed differently from Coltrane, Sanders was strongly influenced by their collaboration together. Spiritual elements such as the chanting in Om would later show up in many of Sanders' own works. Sanders would also go on to produce much free jazz, modified from Coltrane's solo-centric conception. In 1968 he participated in Michael Mantler and Carla Bley's Jazz Composer's Orchestra Association album The Jazz Composer's Orchestra, featuring Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Larry Coryell and Gato Barbieri.
In the 1970s, Sanders pursued his own recordings and continued to work with the likes of Alice Coltrane on her Journey In Satchidananda album. Most of Sanders' best-selling work was made in the late 60's and early 70s for Impulse Records, including the 30-minute wave-on-wave of free jazz "The Creator has a Master Plan" from the album Karma. This composition featured vocalist Leon Thomas' unique, "umbo weti" yodeling, and Sanders' key musical partner, pianist Lonnie Liston Smith, who worked with Sanders from 1969-1971. Other members of his groups in this period include bassist Cecil McBee, on albums such as Jewels of Thought, Izipho Zam, Deaf Dumb Blind and Thembi.
Although supported by African-American radio, Sanders' brand of free jazz became less popular. From the experiments with African rhythms on the 1971 album Black Unity (with bassist Stanley Clarke) onwards he began to diversify his sound. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Sanders explored different musical modes including R'n'B (Love Will Find a Way), modal jazz, and hard bop.
In 1994 he traveled to Morocco to record the Bill Laswell-produced album The Trance Of Seven Colors with Gnawa musician Mahmoud Guinia. Sanders worked with Laswell, Jah Wobble, and others on the albums Message From Home (1996) and Save Our Children (1998). In 1999, he complained in an interview that despite his pedigree, he had trouble finding work. The same year, Sanders appeared on the Red Hot Organization's album, Stolen Moments: Red Hot + Cool, on the track "This is Madness" with Umar bin Hassan and Abiodun Oyewole and the bonus track, "The Creator Has A Master Plan (Trip hop Remix)." The album was named "Album of the Year" by Time.
In the 2000s, a resurgence of interest in jazz has kept Sanders playing festivals including the 2007 Melbourne Jazz Festival and the 2008 Big Chill Festival, concerts, and releasing albums. He has a strong following in Japan, and in 2003 recorded with the band Sleep Walker. Pharoah Sanders is currently represented by Addeo Music International.

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Discography:


As leader

  • 1964-Pharoah's First(ESP-Disk)
  • 1966-Tauhid(Impulse! Records)
  • 1969-Izipho Zam (Strata-East Records)
  •  1969-Karma(Impulse!)
  • 1969-Jewels of Thought(Impulse!)
  • 1970-Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun)(Impulse!)
  • 1971-Thembi(Impulse!)
  • 1971-Village of the Pharoahs(Impulse!)
  • 1971-Black Unity(Impulse!)
  • 1971-Live at the East(Impulse!)
  • 1972-Wisdom Through Music(Impulse!)
  • 1973-Elevation(Impulse!) 
  • 1973-Love in Us All(ASD)
  • 1974-Voyage to Uranus(Capitol)
  • 1977-Pharoah(India Navigation)
  • 1977-Love Will Find a Way(Arista)
  • 1978-Beyond a Dream(with Norman Connors)(Arista)
  • 1980-Journey to the One (Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1981-Live(Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1981-Rejoice(Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1982-Heart is a Melody(Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1985-Shukuru(Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1989-Oh Lord, Let Me Do No Wrong(Columbia)
  • 1987-A Prayer Before Dawn(Theresa (Evidence))
  • 1987-Africa(Timeless)
  • 1989-Moonchild(Timeless)
  • 1990-Welcome to Love(Timeless)
  • 1992-Crescent with Love(Evidence)
  • 1994-The Trance Of Seven Colors (with Mahmoud Guinia)(Axiom)
  • 1995-Naima(Evidence)
  • 1996-Message from Home(Verve)
  • 1999-Save our Children(Verve)
  • 2000-Spirits(Meta)
  • 2003-With a Heartbeat(Evolver)
  • 2003-The Creator Has a Master Plan(Venus)

As sideman


With John Coltrane


With Alice Coltrane

  • A Monastic Trio (1968)
  • Ptah, the El Daoud (1970)
  • Journey in Satchidananda (1970)


With Don Cherry

  • Symphony for Improvisers (1966)
  • Where Is Brooklyn? (1967)
with Norman Connors
  • Romantic Journey (1977)
  • This is your Life (1977)
  • Remember Who You Are (1993)

with others
  • 1964-Sun Ra-feat Ph. Sanders and Black Herold 
  • 1965 - Ornette Coleman - Chappaqua Suite
  • 1968-Dave Burrell - High Won-High Two
  • 1968-Pharoah Sanders Ensemble with Albert Ayler
  • 1968 - Jazz Composer's Orchestra - The Jazz Composer's Orchestra 
  • 1968-Gary Bartz - Another Earth 
  • 1969-Leon Thomas - Spirits Known and Unknown
  • 1969-The Latin Jazz Quintet - Oh! Pharoah Speak
  • 1973-Larry Young - Lawrence Of Newark 
  • 1977-Phyllis Hyman - One on One
  • 1978-Hilton Ruiz - Fantasia
  • 1978 - Ed Kelly - Ed Kelly & Friends (Ed Kelly & Pharoah Sanders)
  • 1980-Idris Muhammad - Kabsha
  • 1981-Tisziji Munoz - Visiting the Planet
  • 1982-Elvin Jones-McCoy Tyner Quintet – Love & Peace 
  • 1985 - Art Davis - Life
  • 1987-McCoy Tyner - Blues for Coltrane
  • 1987-Benny Golson - This is for you, John
  • 1990-The Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir - Live!
  • 1991 - Sonny Sharrock - Ask the Ages
  • 1991-Randy Weston - The Spirits Of Our Ancestors
  • 1991-Randy Weston - African Sunrise
  • 1993-Bheki Mseleku - Timelessness
  • 1994 -Franklin Kiermyer - Solomon's Daughter
  • 1995-Steve Turre - Rhythm Within from drhotte
  • 1995-Jah Wobble - Heaven & Earth part 1 \ part 2
  • 1996-Aiyb Dieng - Rythmagick
  • 1996-Jali Kunda - Griots of West Africa & Beyond altrn
  • 1996-Sonny Sharrock - Into Another Light
  • 1996-Wallace Roney - Village from drhotte
  • 1997-The Last Poets - Time Has Come altrn
  • 1997-Tisziji Munoz - River of Blood
  • 1997-Tisziji Munoz - Present Without a Trace
  • 1997-Tisziji Munoz - Spirit World
  • 1997-Arcana-Arc of Testemony
  • 1997-Music Revelation Ensemble-Cross Fire
  • 1998-Terry Callier - Timepeace altrn altrn
  • 1998-Chakra - The Seven Centers altrn
  • 1998-Randy Weston - Khepera
  • 2000-Kahil El’Zabar’s Ritual Trio - Africa N’Da Blus
  • 2000 - Alex Blake - Now is the Time: Live at the Knitting Factory 
  • 2000 - Kahil El'Zabar's Ritual Trio - Africa N'da Blues
  • 2000-23 Skidoo - 23 Skidoo
  • 2001-Tisziji Munoz-Devine Radiance
  • 2001-Gigi - Gigi
  • 2003-VA-Asana 3: Peaceful Heart
  • 2003-Lonesome Echo Productions - Silver Ocean
  • 2003-Lili Haydn - Light Blue Sun
  • 2004-David Murray & Gwo-Ka Masters-Gwotet
  • 2006-Kenny Garrett Beyond The Wall
  • 2007-Method of Defiance - Inamorata
  • 2008 - Kenny Garrett - Sketches of MD: Live at the Iridium
  • 2008 - Sleep Walker - "Into The Sun" (on "The Voyage")
  • 2008-Kahil El Zabar's Ritual Trio - Ooh Live! 


Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Legend : Miles Davis




Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer.

Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. Many well-known musicians rose to prominence as members of Davis's ensembles, including saxophonists Gerry Mulligan, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, George Coleman, Wayne Shorter, and Kenny Garrett; trombonist J. J. Johnson; pianists Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett; guitarists John McLaughlin, John Scofield and Mike Stern; bassists Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, and Dave Holland; and drummers Tony Williams, Billy Cobham and Jack DeJohnette.

On October 7, 2008, his album Kind of Blue, released in 1959, received its fourth platinum certification from the RIAA, signifying sales of 4 million copies. Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006. Davis was noted as "one of the key figures in the history of jazz".

On November 5, 2009, Rep. John Conyers of Michigan sponsored a measure in the US House of Representatives to recognize and commemorate the album Kind of Blue on its 50th anniversary. The measure also affirms jazz as a national treasure and "encourages the United States government to preserve and advance the art form of jazz music."It passed, unanimously, with a vote of 409–0 on December 15, 2009.
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Studio albums
  • First Miles (1945)
  • Cool Boppin' (1948)
  • Birth of the Cool (1949 and 1950) 
  • ConceptiFon (1951)
  • Blue Period (1951)
  • Dig (1951)
  • Miles Davis and Horns (1951 )
  • Miles Davis Volume 1 (Blue Note Records, 1952 and 1954)
  • Miles Davis Volume 2 (Blue Note Records, 1953)
  • Blue Haze (1953 and 1954)
  • Collectors' Items (1953 and 1956)
  • Walkin' (1954)
  • Bags' Groove (1954)
  • Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants (1954, with one track from 1956)
  • Musings of Miles (1955) 
  • Blue Moods (1955)
  • Quintet / Sextet (1955, Miles Davis and Milt Jackson)
  • Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet (1955)
  • Cookin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Relaxin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Workin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Steamin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • 'Round About Midnight (1955-1956) 
  • Miles Ahead (1957)
  • Ascenseur pour l'Échafaud (Fontana Records, 1957 - film soundtrack)
  • Cannonball Adderley meets Miles Davis(1958)
  • Somethin' Else (Blue Note Records, 1958 - Cannonball Adderley quintet)
  • Milestones (1958)
  • Jazz Track (1958)
  • Porgy and Bess (1958)
  • 1958 Miles (1958)
  • Kind of Blue (1959
  • Sketches of Spain (1960) (RIAA: Gold)  
  • Someday My Prince Will Come (1961) 
  • Quiet Nights (1962-1963)
  • Seven Steps to Heaven (1963)
  • E.S.P (1965)
  • Miles Smiles (1966)
  • Sorcerer (1967
  • Nefertiti (1967)
  • Miles in the Sky (1968)
  • Filles de Kilimanjaro (1969 - 1968)
  • In a Silent Way (1969)
  • Bitches Brew (1970)
  • (A Tribute to) Jack Johnson (1970)
  • Live-Evil (1971 - 1970) 
  • On the Corner (1972)
  • Big Fun (1974_1969-1972) 
  • Get Up with It (1974 ) 
  • Water Babies (1976 - previously unissued recordings from 1967 & 1968)
  • Circle in the Round (1979 - previously unissued recordings from 1955-1970)
  • Directions (1981 -(1960-1970)) 
  • The Man With The Horn (1981)
  • Star People (1983)
  • Decoy (1984)
  • You're Under Arrest (1985)
  • Tutu (1986) 
  • Music from Siesta (1987 - film soundtrack)
  • Amandla (1989)
  • Aura (1989)
  • Dingo (1991 - film soundtrack)
  • Doo-Bop (1992) 

Live recordings

  • The Real Birth of the Cool (Miles’ nonet live at the Royal Roost) (1948)
  • Complete Birdland Recordings (1951-52)

  • Miles & Coltrane (1955)
  • Miles Davis Quintet at Peacock Alley (1956)
  • Amsterdam Concert (1957)
  • Miles Davis at Newport 1958 (1958)
  • Live in Den Haag (1960)
  • Miles Davis & John Coltrane. Live in Stockholm Live at the Konserthuset, Stockholm (1960)
  • Olympia, 20th March 1960 (1960)
  • Manchester Concert (1960) flac
  • Olympia, 11th October 1960 (1960)
  • Miles Davis At Carnegie Hall (1961)
  • Miles & Monk at Newport (1963 release of 1958 concert)
  • In Europe (1963)
  • Live at the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival (1963)
  • My Funny Valentine (1964)
  • Four & More (1964)
  • Miles In Tokyo (1964)
  • Miles In Berlin (1964)
  • The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965 (1965)
  • 1969 Miles Festival de Juan les Pins (1969)
  • Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970: It's About That Time (1970)
  • Black Beauty: Live at the Fillmore West (1970)
  • Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East (1970)
  • Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 (1970)
  • The Cellar Door Sessions (1970)
  • In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall (1972)
  • Jazz at the Plaza (1973 release of 1958 appearance)
  • Dark Magus (1974) disc 1 disc 2
  • Agharta (1975) altrn(Japan)
  • Pangaea (1975)
  • Miles! Miles! Miles! (1981)
  • We Want Miles (1982)
  • Munich Concert (1988) 1 \ 2 \ 3
  • The Complete Miles Davis at Montreux (1973-1991)
  • Miles & Quincy Live At Montreux (1991)
  • Live Around The World (1988-1991)
Box sets

  • The Complete Columbia Recordings of Miles Davis with John Coltrane (1955–1961)
  • Miles Davis & Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings (1957–1968)
  • Seven Steps: The Complete Columbia Recordings of Miles Davis 1963–1964 
  • The Complete Studio Recordings of The Miles Davis Quintet 1965–1968
  • The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions (1968–1969)
  • The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions (1969–1970)
  • The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions (1970)
  • The Complete On the Corner Sessions (1972–1975)
  • Miles Davis: The Complete Columbia Album Collection (1955-1985)
  • In Person Friday and Saturday Nights at the Blackhawk, Complete (1961)
  • The Complete Live Recordings 1948-1955 (10 CD Box 2006)
  • The Complete Prestige Recordings '51-'56 (8 Cd's box) - 1993
  • Young Miles 1945 -1950 [4CD Boxset](2001) 1 \ 2 \ 3 \ 4
  • The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions 16 Nov. '55-8 Dec.'56[4 Cd 's Box-Set 2006]

Friday, March 13, 2009

Sun Ra Discography

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This post is definitely going to be one of my favorite post I have done on Blax-Jive. Sun Ra is simply genius. His life is beyond music and deeper than what you may hear. I'm proud to make this post and I hope everyone take advantages of the selected biographies I will have listed. I am only going to post a summary of Sun Ra, but its much deeper than what I am posting.

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Sun Ra (May 22, 1914 to May 30, 1993) was an innovative and individual jazz composer, bandleader and piano and synthesizer player, who came to be known as much for preaching his bizarre cosmic philosophy as for his phenomenal musical compositions and performances.

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Born Herman "Sonny" Blount in Birmingham, Alabama, he abandoned his birth name and took on the name of Sun Ra (Ra being the name of the ancient Egyptian god of the Sun) and headed a band with an ever-changing ensemble known as the "Arkestra" (or sometimes "Solar Arkestra").

The musical development of Sun Ra can be (loosely) categorized into three periods:

The first period of the 1950s was when his music evolved from big-band Swing into the outer space-themed "cosmic jazz" he was best known for. Early inhis career, Ra worked as an arranger for Fletcher Henderson. Music critics and jazz historians say some of his best work was recorded during this period. Notable Sun Ra albums from the 1950s include Sun Ra Visits Planet Earth, Interstellar Low Ways, Angels And Demons At Play, We Travel The Spaceways, and Jazz In Silhouette (among many others).
It was during the 1950s that Sun Ra began wearing the outlandish, Egyptian-styled costumes and headdresses he would be known for. Claiming that he was not from the Planet Earth but rather from Saturn, Ra developed a complicated persona of "cosmic" philosophies and lyrical poetry that preached "awareness" and peace above all. He eschewed racism (having been a victim of it many times, in regards to the touring and booking schedule of the Arkestra), though he rarely came out and directly spoke about any controversial subjects. He preferred to make music, which he did, as the cast of musicians touring and working with him changed on an almost daily basis.
(The most notable graduate of the Sun Ra Arkestra was John Gilmore, a saxophonist whose work influenced that of John Coltrane).
During the 1960s, his music underwent a chaotic, free jazz experimental period. It was during this period that his popularity reached its peak, as the "beat generation" and the psychedelic era embraced him. In this era, Ra was among the first of any musicians to make extensive use of synthesizers and other various electronic instruments. Newcomers to Ra's music may have difficulty with his albums of this era. Notable titles from this period include The Magic City, When Sun Comes Out, The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra, Volume One and Other Planes Of There.
During their third period, beginning in the 1970s and onward, Sun Ra and the Arkestra settled down into a more conventional method (though still highly eclectic and energetic), and Ra took a liking to the films of Walt Disney. He incorporated smatterings of Disney's musical numbers into many of his performances from then on; and in the late 1980s the Arkestra even performed a concert at Walt Disney World. The Arkestra's version of "Pink Elephants on Parade" is available on Stay Awake, a compilation of Disney tunes by many artists.
A number of Sun Ra's 1970s concerts are available on CD, but none have received a wide release in comparison to his earlier music. The album Atlantis can be considered the landmark that led into his 1970s era.

During his career Sun Ra recorded over one hundred albums, but many of them were printed on microlabels, and his music was largely unknown outside of the live jazz touring circuit. In the 1990s, after he had left this plane of existence, many of his recordings were released on compact disc for the first time under the Ihnfinity Music label.

The Arkestra continues to tour and perform as of November 2003, now led by alto saxophonist Marshall Allen.

Sun Ra and his Arkestra were the subject of a documentary film made in 1972 and a feature film entitled Space Is The Place in 1974. The soundtrack, also by Sun Ra, is available on CD.

Some recommended albums (by no means all-inclusive): Atlantis, Supersonic Jazz, Cosmic Tones for Mental Therapy, We Travel the Spaceways, Singles, Languidity, The Magic City.








Brother From Another Planet [Documentary On Sun Ra]






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Albums

Read the companion guide to this thread by Jon-A at The Astro-Infinity Equation

Posthumous Releases

Two In One Albums

Live Bootlegs

Singles

Compilations

Mixtapes


Covers and Interpretations

Miscellaneous
Arkestra recordings without Sun Ra (post 1993)

Audio Interviews

Video


"Brother From Another Planet : The Sun Ra Story"

(2005, BBC documentary, 1.9.GB)

- text search "BBC" on the page.

"Space Is The Place"
(1972, released in 1974, 81 mins).


"Sun Ra - A Joyful Noise"
Documentary film by Robert Mugge (1980)

from Transparency DVD 0171
"Sun Ra Volume Two: Sun Ra Arkestra East and West Berlin"



Resources & Selected Biographies

Some notable sources & links :

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