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Showing posts with label Blaxploitation Contribution. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Blaxploitation Contribution. Show all posts

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Legendary Group:The Memphis Horns



Arguably the greatest soul horn section ever, the Memphis Horns were a critical part of the Stax formula during the '60s and '70s, as well as prolific contributors to numerous other sessions since the label's demise. Though today the name is identified with the duo of trumpeter Wayne Jackson and tenor saxophonist Andrew Love, the band at one time also included tenor saxophonist Ed Logan, trombonists Lewis Collins and Jack Hale, and baritone saxophonist James Mitchell. This was the lineup that recorded for RCA in the '70s, cutting LPs produced by Booker T. Jones and others. They also backed King Curtis and Aretha Franklin in the '70s. But they are best known for appearances on songs by virtually every Stax artist. The duo of Jackson and Love issued their own LP in 1992 for an independent label.



Discography


  • The Memphis Horns(1970) Cotillion
  • Horns for Everything(1972)Million
  • High on Music(1976)RCA Records
  • Get up and Dance(1977)RCA Records
  • Memphis Horns Band 2(1978)RCA Records
  • WelcomeTo Memphis(1979)RCA Records
  • Flame Out(1992) Lucky Seven
  • The Memphis Horns with Special Guests(1995)Telarc Distribution
  • Wishing You a Merry Christmas(1996)Icehouse Records

as invovled sessioners

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Dennis Coffey Discography




Dennis started his playing career by completing his first record date at the age of 15. While still in his early twenties, he had a choice to make that would impact his musical journey. He was offered a job to tour with jazz legend organist Groove Holmes and offered a job to play with the famous Funk Brothers as a studio musician at Motown. Dennis had a family to support so he made the decision to work at Motown.

Read More @ Blax-Pride

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Albums
  • 1970 - Hair and Thangs
  • 1971 - Evolution
  • 1972 - Goin' For Myself
  • 1973 - Electric Coffey
  • 1974 - Black Belt Jones Soundtrack
  • 1974 - Dance Party
  • 1974 - Instant Coffey
  • 1975 - Finger Lickin' Good
  • 1977 - Back Home
  • 1978 - A Sweet Taste of Sin
  • 1989 - Under The Moonlight
  • 1990 - Motor City Magic
  • 2006 - Flight of the Phoenix

Monday, April 20, 2009

Diana Ross & The Supremes Discography


The Supremes comprised of:

  • Diana Ross (b. 26th March 1944, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.)
  • Florence Ballard (b. 30th June 1943, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A., d. 22 February 1976)
  • Mary Wilson (b. 6th March 1944, Greenville, Mississippi, U.S.A.)
  • Betty McGlown (b. 1943, Detroit Michigan, U.S.A.)

other members at various times included:

  • Barbara Martin (between the years 1960 - 1962)
  • Cindy Birdsong (between the years 1967 – 1972 and 1973 – 1976)
  • Jean Terrell (between the years 1970 – 1973)
  • Lynda Laurence (between the years 1972 – 1973)
  • Scherrie Payne (b 14th November 1944, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.)
  • Susaye Greene (between the years 1976 – 1977)

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The Supremes were, probably, the first Black female group to take the art of merging popular music and fashion to another level, whilst still retaining their own R & B heritage without any artistical surrender. Their first incarnation emerged under the group name of Primettes. Betty McGlown was dating Paul Williams of The Primes at the time, and was the first Primette. Florence Ballard met Eddie Kendricks and Paul Williams of the Primes, the mangager of the male group, Milton Jenkins, created the Primettes. The Primes were later to become The Temptations. The founding members of the Primettes were Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson, (the then) Diane Ross and Betty McGlown, whom all lived at the Brewster-Douglass public housing project in Detroit. Florence Ballard had recruited Mary Wilson, who in turn recruited Diana Ross.



The Primettes issued a single on a small local label, for Lupine Records (a label created just for them) entitled 'Tears of Sorrow' b/w 'Pretty Baby'. Barbara Martin was to replace Betty McGlown in 1960. In 1960, Diana Ross asked an old neighbour, the Miracles lead singer Smokey Robinson, to help the group land an audition for Motown executive Berry Gordy. Smokey organised the audition, however, he was keen to recruit to his own groups ranks, the Primette's guitarist, Marv Tarplin. After concerns regarding the Primette's ages, the group signed with Motown the following year as The Supremes. Barbara Martin then left the group in early 1962, and Diana Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson became the Supreme line-up familiar to many. The Supreme's name was only decided upon following the suggestions of 'The Darleens', 'The Sweet Ps', 'The Melodees', 'The Royaltones' and 'The Jewelettes'. Diana Ross was aginst the name 'the Supremes', initially, as she felt the name had a male influence.

The Supremes early releases saw only minor success, leaving the group with a regular reputation for missing out on chart success. Diana Ross then took the place of Florence Ballard as the group's regular lead vocalist, at Berry Gordy's suggestion, which did bring chart success at last. 'When The Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes', was the group's first hit in December 1963 (the song made number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100).




In the spring of 1964, The Supremes recorded the single 'Where Did Our Love Go?', (a song originally destined for The Marvelettes, who turned it down). 'Where Did Our Love Go' went on to reach number one on the U.S. pop charts,and was the first song to appear on the U.K. pop charts, where it reached number three. The follow-up releases, 'Baby Love' (which was was nominated for the 1965 Grammy Award for Best Rhythm & Blues Recording), 'Come See About Me', 'Stop! In The Name Of Love' and 'Back In My Arms Again', all topped the U.S. singles charts, whilst 'Baby Love' became the only record by an American group to reach number 1 in Britain in 1964.



In 1966, 'You Keep Me Hangin' On" was awarded the 1966 Grammy for Best Pop single. Unlike many of her R & B contemporaries, Diana Ross sang the songs, note for note, with little elaboration, allowing her fragile delivery to carry the song into a radio friendly environment. Along with the Motown hit machine behind the group, the women had also become fashion role models for many young Black Americans. Much of this was accomplished under the instruction of Motown chief Berry Gordy and Maxine Powell, who ran Motown's in-house finishing school and Artist Development department. The Supremes had, by now become household names, as well as international stars. By the end of 1966, the group had scored further success on the national charts with the singles, 'I Hear a Symphony', 'You Can't Hurry Love' and 'You Keep Me Hangin' On'.




An album entitled 'The Supremes A' Go-Go', became the first album by an all-female group to reach number one on the U.S. Billboard 200. The Supremes recorded albums of Broadway standards, played residencies at expensive nightclubs, and were groomed by Motown staff as all-round entertainers. A 1967 single, 'The Happening', saw the group attempt to become part of the psychedelic movement. All was not well within the group, as Florence Ballard had grown increasingly unhappy in the supporting role into which Berry Gordy had repositioned her into. Floence began to drink heavily, she put on weight, and at times could no longer comfortably wear many of her stage outfits. Resentful of the attention given to Diana Ross, Florence Ballard relied heavily upon the advice of fellow Supreme Mary Wilson, imparting her belief that Diana and Berry Gordy were intent upon her dismissal from the group. That belief saw fruition in 1967, with Florence becoming replaced by Cindy Birdsong (a former member of the Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles group) Florence Ballard was, eventually, removed in February 1968, when she received a one off payment of $139,804.94 in royalties and earnings.

Florence pursued a short lived solo career with ABC Records. She eventually sank into poverty and died abruptly on 22nd of February 1976 from coronary thrombosis at the age of 32. The Supremes name became changed to Diana Ross and the Supremes, seemingly validating Ballard's concerns. Several other Motown acts followed suit regarding the name changes, with The Vandella's becoming Martha Reeves and the Vandella's being one example. 'Reflections' was released, moving the Supremes into a new musical area, incorporating social commentary.



Examples of this manifested themselves in the songs 'Love Child' and 'I'm Livin' In Shame' (the first of which was another U.S. number 1). The Supremes also formed a successful resurrected partnership / recording partnership with the Temptations, highlighted by the hit single 'I'm Gonna Make You Love Me'. During 1969, there were persistent rumours that Berry Gordy was about to launch Diana Ross on a solo career (the pair were rumoured at the time to have become an item). These fears were confirmed at the end of the year, when the Supremes staged a farewell performance. Diana Ross said her goodbyes to the Supremes with the song 'Someday We'll Be Together', a U.S. chart hit on which, ironically, she was the only member of the Supremes to appear. Diana Ross & The Supremes gave their final performance on the 14th of January 1970 at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas.

This trio recorded the self titled 'Mary, Scherrie and Susaye' in 1976, also releasing 'Hi Energy' the same year, before disbanding the following year. The Supremes then released 'I'm Gonna Let My Heart Do the Walking', their final Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and their third number-one single on the disco singles chart. On the 12th of June 1977, The Supremes performed their farewell concert at the Drury Lane Theatre in London. Mary Wilson attempted to assemble a new set of Supremes for recording purposes, and toured Britain in 1978 with Karen Rowland and Karen Jackson in the line-up. This did not come to fruition as the name 'the Supremes' had become the legal ownership of Motown Records. Jean Terrell, Scherrie Payne and Lynda Laurence won the rights, however, to use the Supremes' name in the UK. Scherrie began recording disco material with producer Ian Levine in 1989, for the Nightmare and Motor City labels. Levine also signed Laurence, Wilson and ex Supreme Susaye Greene to solo contracts and recorded Terrell, Lawrence and Greene for a remake of 'Stoned Love'. In 1988 the Supremes were inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

The career of Mary Wilson has also continued with a starring role in the Toronto, Canada production of the stage musical 'The Beehive' in 1989 and the publication of the second volume of her autobiography in 1990. In 2006, the Dreamworks movie vehicle 'Dreamgirls', saw Beyonce and Jennifer Hudson taking on the female lead parts in a movie, allegedly (and loosely), based upon the Supremes recorcding career.



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Diana Ross


As a solo artist, Diana Ross is one of the most successful female singers of the rock era. If you factor in her work as the lead singer of the Supremes in the 1960s, she may be the most successful. With her friends Mary Wilson, Florence Ballard, and Barbara Martin, Ross formed the Primettes vocal quartet in 1959. In 1960, they were signed to local Motown Records, changing their name to the Supremes in 1961. Martin then left, and the group continued as a trio. Over the next eight years, the Supremes (renamed "Diana Ross and the Supremes" in 1967, when Cindy Birdsong replaced Ballard) scored 12 number one pop hits. After the last one, "Someday We'll Be Together" (October 1969), Ross launched a solo career.

Motown initially paired her with writer/producers Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, who gave her four Top 40 pop hits, including the number one "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" (July 1970). Ross branched out into acting, starring in a film biography of Billie Holiday, Lady Sings the Blues (November 1972). The soundtrack went to number one, and Ross was nominated for an Academy Award.



She returned to record-making with the Top Ten album Touch Me in the Morning (June 1973) and its chart-topping title song. This was followed by a duet album with Marvin Gaye, Diana & Marvin (October 1973), that produced three chart hits. Ross acted in her second movie, Mahogany (October 1975), and it brought her another chart-topping single in the theme song, "Do You Know Where You're Going To." That and her next number one, the disco-oriented "Love Hangover" (March 1976), were featured on her second album to be titled simply Diana Ross (February 1976), which rose into the Top Ten.



Ross' third film role came in The Wiz (October 1978). The Boss (May 1979) was a gold-selling album, followed by the platinum-selling Diana (May 1980) (the second of her solo albums with that name, though the other, a 1971 TV soundtrack, had an exclamation mark). It featured the number one single "Upside Down" and the Top Ten hit "I'm Coming Out."




Ross scored a third Top Ten hit in 1980 singing the title theme from the movie It's My Turn. She then scored the biggest hit of her career with another movie theme, duetting with Lionel Richie on "Endless Love" (June 1981). It was her last big hit on Motown; after more than 20 years, she decamped for RCA. She was rewarded immediately with a million-selling album, titled after her remake of the old Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers hit, "Why Do Fools Fall in Love," which became her next Top Ten hit. The album also included the Top Ten hit "Mirror, Mirror."




Silk Electric (October 1982) was a gold-seller, featuring the Top Ten hit "Muscles," written and produced by Michael Jackson, and Swept Away (September 1984) was another successful album, containing the hit "Missing You," but Ross had trouble selling records in the second half of the 1980s. By 1989, she had returned to Motown, and by 1993 was turning more to pop standards, notably on the concert album Diana Ross Live: The Lady Sings...Jazz & Blues, Stolen Moments (April 1993).

Motown released a four-CD/cassette box set retrospective, Forever Diana, in October 1993, and the singer published her autobiography in 1994. Take Me Higher followed a year later, and in 1999 she returned with Every Day Is a New Day. 2000's Gift of Love was promoted by a concert tour featuring the Supremes, although neither Mary Wilson nor Cindy Birdsong appeared -- their roles were instead assumed by singers Lynda Laurence and Scherrie Payne, neither of whom had ever performed with Ross during the group's glory days. In 2006 Motown finally released Ross' lost album Blue, a collection of standards originally intended as the follow-up to Lady Sings the Blues. The album I Love You from 2007 featured new interpretations of familiar love songs. That same year the cable television network BET honored Ross with their Lifetime Achievement Award.
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The Supremes
**********************
  • (1963) Meet the Supremes
  • The Supremes Sing Ballads & Blues (cancelled, 1963)
  • (1964) Where Did Our Love Go
  • (1964) A Bit of Liverpool
  • (1965) The Supremes Sing Country Western & Pop
  • Live, Live, Live (cancelled, 1965)
  • (1965) We Remember Sam Cooke
  • (1965) More Hits by the Supremes
  • There's a Place for Us (cancelled, 1965)
  • (1965) At the Copa
  • Tribute to the Girls (cancelled, 1965)
  • (1965) Merry Christmas
  • (1965) With Love
  • (1966) I Hear a Symphony
  • Pure Gold (cancelled, 1966)
  • (1966) The Supremes A' Go-Go
  • (1967) The Supremes Sing Holland-Dozier-Holland
  • (1968) Live In Amsterdam
  • The Supremes and the Motown Sound (cancelled, 1967)
  • (1967) The Supremes Sing Rodgers & Hart
  • (1967) Sing and Perform Disney Classics
  • (1967) Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 and 2


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Diana Ross & The Supremes
***********************************
  • (1968) Reflections
  • (1968) Diana Ross and the Supremes Sing and Perform Funny Girl [all Merrill/Styne]
  • (1968) Live at London's Talk of the Town
  • (1968) Love Child
  • (1968) Diana Ross and the Supremes Join the Temptations
  • (1968) T.C.B. - Takin' Care of Business (Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations)
  • (1968) Sing Motown
  • (1969) Let the Sunshine In
  • Together (Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations)
  • (1969) Cream of the Crop / alternate
  • (1969) On Broadway (Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations)
  • (1969) Greatest Hits, Vol. 3
  • (1970) Captured Live on Stage! (aka "Farewell")
Compilations
  • Lost and Found (Rarities, 2 discs)
  • Previously Unreleased
  • Number Ones (2007)
  • Classic
  • 25th Anniversary Vol 2
  • Never Before Released Masters
  • B-Sides 1961-1969
  • Remixes
  • Definitive collection
  • 20 Greatest Hits
  • Love is in our hearts
  • The Silver Collection
  • Greatest Hits - quadraphonic w/ alternate takes
Motown live albums including the Supremes
  • (1963) Live at The Apollo
  • (1965) Motortown Revue In Paris
  • (1970) Motown at the Hollywood Palace
Miscellaneous
  • Coke On Motown - Supremes sing Coca-Cola commercials
  • Those Fantabulous Strings Play The Supremes Hits - good cheesy lounge!
  • VA - Motown in a Foreign Language - includes foreign language versions of Supremes songs.
Singles
  • (1966) Times are Changing - promo single for Equal Opportunities campaign.

***********************************************
The '70s Supremes (With Jean Terrell)
***********************************************
  • (1970) Right On
  • (1970) The Magnificent 7 (The Supremes and the Four Tops)
  • (1970) New Ways but Love Stays
  • (1971) The Return of the Magnificent Seven (The Supremes and the Four Tops)
  • (1971) Touch
  • (1971) Dynamite (The Supremes and the Four Tops)
  • Promises Kept (cancelled, 1972)
  • (1972) Floy Joy
  • (1972) The Supremes Arranged and Produced by Jimmy Webb
  • (1974) Anthology
Compilations
  • More Unreleased
  • The 70s Anthology


*************************************************
The '70s Supremes (With Scherrie Payne)
*************************************************
  • (1975) The Supremes
  • (1976) High Energy
  • (1976) Mary, Scherrie and Susaye
Remix singles
  • High Energy (Fromage Mother edit)

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Diana Ross Discography
********************
  • (1970)Diana Ross
  • (1970)-Everything Is Everything
  • (1971) Diana!
  • (1971) Surrender
  • (1972) Lady Sings The Blues
  • (1973) Touch Me In The Morning
  • (1973) with Marvin Gaye: Diana And Marvin
  • (1973)Last Time I Saw Him(Limited Expanded Edition)
  • (1974) Diana Ross Live At Caesar's Palace
  • (1975) Mahogany
  • (1976) Diana Ross
  • (1977) An Evening With Diana Ross
  • (1977) Baby It's Me
  • (1978) Ross
  • (1979) The Boss
  • (1980) Diana deluxe edition 2 Cds
  • (1981) To Love Again
  • (1981) Why Do Fools Fall In Love
  • (1982) Silk Electric
  • (1983) Ross
  • (1984) Swept Away
  • (1985) Eaten Alive
  • (1987) Red Hot Rhythm N' Blues
  • (1989) Working Overtime
  • (1989) Greatest Hits Live
  • (1991) Force Behind The Power
  • (1993) Stolen Moments - The Lady Sings... Jazz & Blues
  • (1993) Christmas In Vienna with Placido Domingo, José Carreras
  • (1994) Making Spirits Bright (christmas)
  • (1995) Take Me Higher
  • (1998) Very Special Season (christmas)
  • (1999) Every Day Is a New Day / alternate
  • (2006) Blue / FLAC version
  • (2006) I Love You

Diana Ross - Remix albums
  • In Da Mix
  • Some Mixed Tracks
  • Rare Themes
  • Mixed Vol 1
Diana Ross - Remix singles
  • 1995 - 'Take Me Higher' (BT and T-empo mixes)
  • 2007 - 'Love Hangover' (almighty anthem mix)
Diana Ross - Compilations
  • 16 top ten singles 1970-99
  • (2002) The Best Of Diana Ross
  • (1993) The Ultimate Collection
  • (2001) Love and Life - The Very Best of
Diana Ross - miscellaneous
  • Diana Ross : sheet music for piano, guitar, lyrics
  • Diana Ross : discography

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Solo releases by other members
********************
  • (1979) Mary Wilson - Mary Wilson
  • (1979) Sherrie and Susaye
  • Florence Ballard - The Supreme Florence

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Video
********************
  • (1972) Lady Sings the Blues

Friday, March 13, 2009

Sun Ra Discography

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This post is definitely going to be one of my favorite post I have done on Blax-Jive. Sun Ra is simply genius. His life is beyond music and deeper than what you may hear. I'm proud to make this post and I hope everyone take advantages of the selected biographies I will have listed. I am only going to post a summary of Sun Ra, but its much deeper than what I am posting.

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Sun Ra (May 22, 1914 to May 30, 1993) was an innovative and individual jazz composer, bandleader and piano and synthesizer player, who came to be known as much for preaching his bizarre cosmic philosophy as for his phenomenal musical compositions and performances.

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Born Herman "Sonny" Blount in Birmingham, Alabama, he abandoned his birth name and took on the name of Sun Ra (Ra being the name of the ancient Egyptian god of the Sun) and headed a band with an ever-changing ensemble known as the "Arkestra" (or sometimes "Solar Arkestra").

The musical development of Sun Ra can be (loosely) categorized into three periods:

The first period of the 1950s was when his music evolved from big-band Swing into the outer space-themed "cosmic jazz" he was best known for. Early inhis career, Ra worked as an arranger for Fletcher Henderson. Music critics and jazz historians say some of his best work was recorded during this period. Notable Sun Ra albums from the 1950s include Sun Ra Visits Planet Earth, Interstellar Low Ways, Angels And Demons At Play, We Travel The Spaceways, and Jazz In Silhouette (among many others).
It was during the 1950s that Sun Ra began wearing the outlandish, Egyptian-styled costumes and headdresses he would be known for. Claiming that he was not from the Planet Earth but rather from Saturn, Ra developed a complicated persona of "cosmic" philosophies and lyrical poetry that preached "awareness" and peace above all. He eschewed racism (having been a victim of it many times, in regards to the touring and booking schedule of the Arkestra), though he rarely came out and directly spoke about any controversial subjects. He preferred to make music, which he did, as the cast of musicians touring and working with him changed on an almost daily basis.
(The most notable graduate of the Sun Ra Arkestra was John Gilmore, a saxophonist whose work influenced that of John Coltrane).
During the 1960s, his music underwent a chaotic, free jazz experimental period. It was during this period that his popularity reached its peak, as the "beat generation" and the psychedelic era embraced him. In this era, Ra was among the first of any musicians to make extensive use of synthesizers and other various electronic instruments. Newcomers to Ra's music may have difficulty with his albums of this era. Notable titles from this period include The Magic City, When Sun Comes Out, The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra, Volume One and Other Planes Of There.
During their third period, beginning in the 1970s and onward, Sun Ra and the Arkestra settled down into a more conventional method (though still highly eclectic and energetic), and Ra took a liking to the films of Walt Disney. He incorporated smatterings of Disney's musical numbers into many of his performances from then on; and in the late 1980s the Arkestra even performed a concert at Walt Disney World. The Arkestra's version of "Pink Elephants on Parade" is available on Stay Awake, a compilation of Disney tunes by many artists.
A number of Sun Ra's 1970s concerts are available on CD, but none have received a wide release in comparison to his earlier music. The album Atlantis can be considered the landmark that led into his 1970s era.

During his career Sun Ra recorded over one hundred albums, but many of them were printed on microlabels, and his music was largely unknown outside of the live jazz touring circuit. In the 1990s, after he had left this plane of existence, many of his recordings were released on compact disc for the first time under the Ihnfinity Music label.

The Arkestra continues to tour and perform as of November 2003, now led by alto saxophonist Marshall Allen.

Sun Ra and his Arkestra were the subject of a documentary film made in 1972 and a feature film entitled Space Is The Place in 1974. The soundtrack, also by Sun Ra, is available on CD.

Some recommended albums (by no means all-inclusive): Atlantis, Supersonic Jazz, Cosmic Tones for Mental Therapy, We Travel the Spaceways, Singles, Languidity, The Magic City.








Brother From Another Planet [Documentary On Sun Ra]






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Albums

Read the companion guide to this thread by Jon-A at The Astro-Infinity Equation

Posthumous Releases

Two In One Albums

Live Bootlegs

Singles

Compilations

Mixtapes


Covers and Interpretations

Miscellaneous
Arkestra recordings without Sun Ra (post 1993)

Audio Interviews

Video


"Brother From Another Planet : The Sun Ra Story"

(2005, BBC documentary, 1.9.GB)

- text search "BBC" on the page.

"Space Is The Place"
(1972, released in 1974, 81 mins).


"Sun Ra - A Joyful Noise"
Documentary film by Robert Mugge (1980)

from Transparency DVD 0171
"Sun Ra Volume Two: Sun Ra Arkestra East and West Berlin"



Resources & Selected Biographies

Some notable sources & links :

Post set up self-science and maintained by Simon. Big thanks to : Mr. Moo; stu; guijira; arkadin; free défendu; ish; drhotte, sawanotsuru, Disco_3000, reza, Jon-A, free bones, pathways to unknown worlds, filbert and trane rider at CIA. Also thanks to everyone who has contributed and offered advice; and all of the blogs linked to here.

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