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Showing posts with label Jazz. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jazz. Show all posts

Friday, March 23, 2012

The Legendary Max Roach



Born: January 10, 1925 | Died: August 16, 2007 Instrument: Drums

Maxwell Lemuel Roach is a percussionist, drummer, and jazz composer. He has worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Sonny Rollins. He is widely considered to be one of the most important drummers in the history of jazz.

Roach was born in Newland, North Carolina, to Alphonse and Cressie Roach; his family moved to Brooklyn, New York when he was 4 years old. He grew up in a musical context, his mother being a gospel singer, and he started to play bugle in parade orchestras at a young age. At the age of 10, he was already playing drums in some gospel bands. He performed his first big-time gig in New York City at the age of sixteen, substituting for Sonny Greer in a performance with the Duke Ellington Orchestra.



In 1942, Roach started to go out in the jazz clubs of the 52nd Street and at 78th Street & Broadway for Georgie Jay's Taproom (playing with schoolmate Cecil Payne). He was one of the first drummers (along with Kenny Clarke) to play in the bebop style, and performed in bands led by Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, Bud Powell, and Miles Davis.

Roach played on many of Parker's most important records, including the Savoy 1945 session, a turning point in recorded jazz.

Two children, son Daryl and daughter Maxine, were born from his first marriage with Mildred Roach. In 1954 he met singer Barbara Jai (Johnson) and had another son, Raoul Jordu.



He continued to play as a freelance while studying composition at the Manhattan School of Music. He graduated in 1952.

During the period 1962-1970, Roach was married to the singer Abbey Lincoln, who had performed on several of Roach's albums. Twin daughters, Ayodele and Dara Rasheeda, were later born to Roach and his third wife, Janus Adams Roach.

Long involved in jazz

education, in 1972 he joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

In the early 2000s, Roach became less active owing to the onset of hydrocephalus-related complications.

Renowned all throughout his performing life, Roach has won an extraordinary array of honors. He was one of the first to be given a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, cited as a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters in France, twice awarded the French Grand Prix du Disque, elected to the International Percussive Society's Hall of Fame and the Downbeat Magazine Hall of Fame, awarded Harvard Jazz Master, celebrated by Aaron Davis Hall, given eight honorary doctorate degrees, including degrees awarded by the University of Bologna, Italy and Columbia University.



In 1952 Roach co-founded Debut Records with bassist Charles Mingus. This label released a record of a concert, billed and widely considered as “the greatest concert ever,” called Jazz at Massey Hall, featuring Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Mingus and Roach. Also released on this label was the groundbreaking bass-and- drum free improvisation, Percussion Discussion.

In 1954, he formed a quintet featuring trumpeter Clifford Brown, tenor saxophonist Harold Land, pianist Richie Powell (brother of Bud Powell), and bassist George Morrow, though Land left the following year and Sonny Rollins replaced him. The group was a prime example of the hard bop style also played by Art Blakey and Horace Silver. Tragically, this group was to be short-lived; Brown and Powell were killed in a car accident on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in June 1956. After Brown and Powell's deaths, Roach continued leading a similarly configured group, with Kenny Dorham (and later the short-lived Booker Little) on trumpet, George Coleman on tenor and pianist Ray Bryant. Roach expanded the standard form of hard-bop using 3/4 waltz rhythms and modality in 1957 with his album Jazz in 3/4 time. During this period, Roach recorded a series of other albums for the EmArcy label featuring the brothers Stanley and Tommy Turrentine.



In 1960 he composed the “We Insist! - Freedom Now” suite with lyrics by Oscar Brown Jr., after being invited to contribute to commemorations of the hundredth anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Using his musical abilities to comment on the African-American experience would be a significant part of his career. Unfortunately, Roach suffered from being blacklisted by the American recording industry for a period in the 1960s. In 1966 with his album Drums Unlimited (which includes several tracks that are entirely drums solos) he proved that drums can be a solo instrument able to play theme, variations, rhythmically cohesive phrases. He described his approach to music as “the creation of organized sound.”

Among the many important records Roach has made is the classic Money Jungle 1962, with Mingus and Duke Ellington. This is generally regarded as one of the very finest trio albums ever made.

During the 70s, Roach formed a unique musical organization--”M'Boom”--a percussion orchestra. Each member of this unit composed for it and performed on many percussion instruments. Personnel included Fred King, Joe Chambers, Warren Smith, Freddie Waits, Roy Brooks, Omar Clay, Ray Mantilla, Francisco Mora, and Eli Fountain.

Not content to expand on the musical territory he had already become known for, Roach spent the decades of the 80s and 90s continually finding new ways to express his musical expression and presentation.



In the early 80s, he began presenting entire concerts solo, proving that this multi-percussion instrument, in the hands of such a great master, could fulfill the demands of solo performance and be entirely satisfying to an audience. He created memorable compositions in these solo concerts; a solo record was released by Bay State, a Japanese label, just about impossible to obtain. One of these solo concerts is available on video, which also includes a filming of a recording date for Chattahoochee Red, featuring his working quartet, Odean Pope, Cecil Bridgewater and Calvin Hill.

He embarked on a series of duet recordings. Departing from the style of presentation he was best known for, most of the music on these recordings is free improvisation, created with the avant-garde musicians Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Archie Shepp, Abdullah Ibrahim and Connie Crothers. He created duets with other performers: a recorded duet with the oration by Martin Luther King, “I Have a Dream”; a duet with video artist Kit Fitzgerald, who improvised video imagery while Roach spontaneously created the music; a classic duet with his life-long friend and associate Dizzy Gillespie; a duet concert recording with Mal Waldron.



He wrote music for theater, such as plays written by Sam Shepard, presented at La Mama E.T.C. in New York City.

He found new contexts for presentation, creating unique musical ensembles. One of these groups was “The Double Quartet.” It featured his regular performing quartet, with personnel as above, except Tyrone Brown replacing Hill; this quartet joined with “The Uptown String Quartet,” led by his daughter Maxine Roach, featuring Diane Monroe, Lesa Terry and Eileen Folson.

Another ensemble was the “So What Brass Quintet,” a group comprised of five brass instrumentalists and Roach, no chordal instrumnent, no bass player. Much of the performance consisted of drums and horn duets. The ensemble consisted of two trumpets, trombone, French horn and tuba. Musicians included Cecil Bridgewater, Frank Gordon, Eddie Henderson, Steve Turre, Delfeayo Marsalis, Robert Stewart, Tony Underwood, Marshall Sealy, and Mark Taylor.



Roach presented his music with orchestras and gospel choruses. He performed a concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He wrote for and performed with the Walter White gospel choir and the John Motley Singers. Roach performed with dancers: the Alvin Aily Dance Company, the Dianne McIntyre Dance Company, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.

In the early 80s, Roach surprised his fans by performing in a hip hop concert, featuring the artist-rapper Fab Five Freddy and the New York Break Dancers. He expressed the insight that there was a strong kinship between the outpouring of expression of these young black artists and the art he had pursued all his life.

During all these years, while he ventured into new territory during a lifetime of innovation, he kept his contact with his musical point of origin. His last recording, “Friendship”, was with trumpet master Clark Terry, the two long-standing friends in duet and quartet.

Link to Article: All About Jazz

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Discography
As leader

  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet (Fantasy)
  • 1953 : Max Roach and his Sextet (Debut)
  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet featuring Hank Mobley (Debut)
  • 1956 : Max Roach + 4 (EmArcy)
  • 1957 : Jazz in ¾ Time
  • 1957-60 : Conte Candoli & Max Roach - Drummin' The Blues & Jazz Structures
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Art Blakey (with Art Blakey)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four at Newport (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four on the Chicago Scene (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max!
  • 1958 : Max Roach with the Boston Percussion Ensemble (EmArcy)
  • 1958 : Deeds not Words (aka Conversation) (Riverside)
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Bud Shank - Sessions (with Bud Shank)
  • 1958 : The Defiant Ones (with Booker Little)
  • 1958 : Deeds, Not Words (with all new cast Ray Draper, Booker Little, George Coleman)
  • 1959 : Rich Versus Roach (with Buddy Rich)
  • 1959 : A Little Sweet (aka. The Many Sides of Max ) (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Award-Winning Drummer (Time T)
  • 1960 : We Insist! (Candid)
  • 1960 : Max Roach + 4 - As Quiet As Kept
  • 1961 : Percussion Bitter Sweet (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1962 : Speak, Brother, Speak!
  • 1962 : It's Time (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1964 : The Max Roach Trio Featuring the Legendary Hasaan (with Hasaan ibn Ali)
  • 1966 : Drums Unlimited (Atlantic) (Leader, with James Spaulding, Freddie Hubbard, Ronnie Mathews, Jymie Merritt, Roland Alexander)
  • 1968 : Sound as Roach (Atlantic)
  • 1968 : Members, Don't Git Weary (Atlantic
  • 1971 : Lift Every Voice and Sing (with J.C. White Singers)
  • 1976 : Force: Sweet Mao-Suid Afrika '76 (duo with Archie Shepp)
  • 1976 : Percussion Discussion (with Art Blakey)
  • 1976 : Nommo (Victor)
  • 1977 : The Loudstar (Horo)
  • 1977 : Solos (Baystate)
  • 1977 : Streams of Consciousness - duo with Dollar Brand
  • 1978 : Confirmation (Fluid Records)
  • 1978 : Birth and Rebirth - duo with Anthony Braxton (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : The Long March - duo with Archie Shepp (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Historic Concerts - duo with Cecil Taylor (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : One in Two - Two in One - duo with Anthony Braxton (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Pictures in a Frame (Soul Note)
  • 1980 : Chattahoochee Red (Columbia)
  • 1982 : Swish - duo with Connie Crothers (New Artists)
  • 1982 : In the Light (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Scott Free (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : It's Christmas Again (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Survivors (Soul Note)
  • 1985 : Easy Winners (Soul Note)
  • 1986 : Bright Moments (Soul Note)
  • 1989 : Max + Dizzy: Paris 1989 - duo with Dizzy Gillespie (A&M)
  • 1991 : To the Max! (Enja)
  • 1995 : Max Roach With The New Orchestra Of Boston And The So What Brass Quintet (Blue Note)
  • 1999 : Beijing Trio (Asian Improv)
  • 2002 : Friendship - with Clark Terry) (Columbia)

With Clifford Brown

  • 1954 : Brown And Roach Incorporated
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach
  • 1954 : Jam Session
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Original Master Recording)
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown & The Max Roach Quartet - Historic California Concert
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Mainstream-Audiofidelity Japan)
  • 1954 : Study in Brown
  • 1954 : More Study in Brown
  • 1955 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1956 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street
  • 1957 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1979 : Live at the Bee Hive (Columbia Records)

With M'Boom

  • 1973 : Re: Percussion (Strata-East Records)
  • 1979 : M'Boom (Columbia)
  • 1984 : Collage (Soul Note)
  • 1992 : Live at S.O.B.'s New York (Blue Moon Records)

Live Albums and Bootlegs
  • 1964 : Live in Europe: Freedom Now Suite (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Tokyo (Denon)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live In Amsterdam - It's Time (Baystate)
  • 1978 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Milan
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Anthony Braxton Live in Alassio
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Archie Shepp Live in Milan [info]
  • 1979 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Frankfurt
  • 1979 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Alassio
  • 1981 : D.Gillespie/J.Moody/M.Roach feat. WDR Big Band - Live in Moers "Charlie Parker Memorial Concert"
  • 1981 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Rome [info]
  • 1982 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Milan [info]
  • 1983 : Live at Vielharmonie (Soul Note)
  • 1990 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Berlin [info]

As sideman

  • 1944 : Rainbow Mist (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1944 : Coleman Hawkins and His All Stars (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1945 : Town Hall, New York, June 22, 1945 (with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker)
  • 1945 - 1948: The Complete Savoy Studio Recordings (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1946 : Mad Be Bop (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1946 : Opus BeBop (with Stan Getz)
  • 1946 : Savoy Jam Party (Don Byas Quartet)
  • 1946 : The Hawk Flies (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1947 : The Bud Powell Trip (with Bud Powell)
  • 1947 : Lullaby in Rhythm (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Charlie Parker on Dial (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Miles Davis - First Miles (with Charlie Parker and Miles Davis)
  • 1947 : Dexter Rides Again (with Dexter Gordon)
  • 1948 : The Band that Never Was (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird on 52nd Street (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird at the Roost (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Birth of the Cool (with Miles Davis)
  • 1949 - 1953: Charlie Parker – Complete Sessions on Verve (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Charlie Parker in France (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Genesis (with Sonny Stitt)
  • 1949 : The Stars of Modern Jazz at Carnegie Hall
  • 1950 : The McGhee-Navarro Sextet (with Howard McGhee)
  • 1951 : The Amazing Bud Powell (with Bud Powell)
  • 1951 : The George Wallington Trip and Septet (with George Wallington)
  • 1951 : Conception (with Miles Davis)
  • 1952 : New Faces, New Sounds (with Gil Melle)
  • 1952 : The Complete Genius (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1952 : The Quintet - Jazz At Massey Hall (Debut Records)
  • 1952 : Live at Rockland Palace (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : The Metronome All Starss. MGM (with Billy Eckstine)
  • 1953 : Chet Baker and Miles Davis with the Lighthouse All-Stars
  • 1953 : Mambo Jazz (with Joe Holiday)
  • 1953 : Yardbird: DC-53 (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : Cohn's Tones (with Al Cohn)
  • 1953 : Diz and Getz (with Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz)
  • 1954 : Dinah Jams Featuring Dinah Washington
  • 1955 : Relaxed Piano Moods (with Hazel Scott)
  • 1955 : Introducing Jimmy Cleveland And His All Stars (EmArcy)
  • 1955 : New Piano Expressions (with John Dennis)
  • 1955 : Herbie Nichols Trio (with Herbie Nichols)
  • 1955 : Work Time (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1955 : The Charles Mingus Quartet plus Max Roach (with Charles Mingus)
  • 1956 : Sonny Rollins Plus 4 (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Sonny Boy (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Introducing Johnny Griffin (with Johnny Griffin)
  • 1956 : The Magnificent Thad Jones (with Thad Jones)
  • 1956 : Brilliant Corners (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1956 : Tour de Force (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : The Music of George Gershwin: I Sing of Thee (with Joe Wilder)
  • 1956 : Rollins Plays for Bird (Sonny Rollins Quintet)
  • 1956 : Saxophone Colossus (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1957 : First Place (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1957 : Sonny Clark Trio
  • 1957 : Jazz Contrasts (with Kenny Dorham)
  • 1957 : Abby Lincoln - That's Him
  • 1958: Booker Little 4 and Max Roach (United Artist)
  • 1958 : Freedom Suite (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1958 : Shadow Waltz (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1959 : Moon-Faced and Starry-Eyed (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Aix En Providence (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1960 : Quiet as it's Kept (Mercury)
  • 1960 : Tommy Turrentine (with Tommy Turrentine)
  • 1960 : Stan 'The Man' Turrentine
  • 1960 : Again! (Affinity)
  • 1960 : Parisian Sketches (Mercury)
  • 1960 : We Insist! Freedom Now Suite (Candid)
  • 1960 : Long as You're Living (Enja)
  • 1960 : Uhuru Afrika (with Randy Weston)
  • 1960 : Sonny Clark Trio (with Sonny Clark)
  • 1961 : Straight Ahead (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1961 : Out Front (with Booker Little)
  • 1961 : Paris Blues (with Duke Ellington)
  • 1962 : Money Jungle (with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus)
  • 1962 : Drum Suite (with Slide Hampton)
  • 1966 : Stuttgart 1963 Concert (with Sonny Rollins
  • 1972 : Newport in New York ‘72 (Roach on 2 tracks only)
  • 1975 : The Bop Session (with Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, John Lewis, Hank Jones and Percy Heath)
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Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Chuck Brown



Chuck Brown (born August 22, 1936 - May 16, 2012) is a guitarist and singer who is affectionately called "The Godfather of Go-go". Go-go is a subgenre of funk music developed in and around Washington, D.C. in the mid- and late 1970s. While its musical classification, influences, and origins are debated, Brown is regarded as the fundamental force behind the creation of go-go music.

Brown's musical career began in the 1960s playing guitar with Jerry Butler and The Earls of Rhythm, joining Los Latinos in 1965. He still performs music today and is commonly known in the Washington, DC area. Brown's early hits include "I Need Some Money" and "Bustin' Loose". "Bustin' Loose" has been adopted by the Washington Nationals baseball team as its home run celebration song, and was interpolated by Nelly for his 2002 number one hit "Hot in Herre." Brown also recorded go-go covers of early jazz and blues songs, such as "Go-Go Swing" Duke Ellington's "It Don't Mean a Thing If Ain't Got That Swing", "Moody's Mood for Love", Johnny Mercer's "Midnight Sun", Louis Jordan's "Run Joe", and T-Bone Walker's "Stormy Monday".

He has influenced other go-go bands such as Big G and The Backyard Band, Rare Essence, Experience Unlimited (EU), Little Benny and the Masters, and Trouble Funk. The song "Ashley's Roachclip" from the Soul Searchers' 1974 album Salt of the Earth contains a famous drum break, sampled countless times in various other tracks.
In the mid-1990s, he performed the theme music of Fox's sitcom The Sinbad Show which later aired on The Family Channel and Disney Channel.

Brown is considered a local legend in Washington, D.C., and has appeared in television advertisements for the Washington Post and other area companies. The D.C. Lottery's "Rolling Cash 5" ad campaign features Chuck Brown singing his 2007 song "The Party Roll" in front of various D.C. city landmarks such as Ben's Chili Bowl.

Brown resides in Waldorf, Maryland. His son, Nekos, was a defensive end/linebacker for the Virginia Tech football team. While his son was in college, Brown scheduled concerts and other appearances around the Hokies home schedule to ensure that he would never miss a game, and became a fixture at Lane Stadium. Following the Virginia Tech massacre, Brown stated in an interview that he was "absolutely devastated" by the tragedy, and cried every day for two weeks. In shows that followed, Brown would pause for a moment in prayer for the victims and their families before beginning his performance, and dedicated several shows to their memory.

Brown was the subject of the cover article in The Washington Post Magazine on October 4, 2009, entitled Chuck Brown's Long Dance. He received his first Grammy Award nomination in 2010 for Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocals for "Love" (with Jill Scott and Marcus Miller), from the album We Got This.

Since the early 1970s, Brown has exclusively played a blonde Gibson ES-335, which is affectionately referred to as his "Blondie."

On September 4, 2011, Brown was honored by the National Symphony Orchestra, as the NSO paid tribute to Legends of Washington Music Labor Day concert - honoring Brown's music, as well as Duke Ellington and John Philip Sousa - with a free concert on the West Lawn of the Capitol. Brown and his band performed capped the evening with a performance.

****************************************************************

Discography:

  • 1972: We the People
  • 1974: Salt of the Earth
  • 1978: Bustin' Loose
  • 1980: Funk Express
  • 1984: We Need Some Money
  • 1986: Go Go Swing Live [Future Sounds Production]
  • 1987: Any Other Way to Go?
  • 1987: Live '87 - D.C. Bumpin' Y'all [live; double album]
  • 1989: Trust Me: Live Pa Tape, Vol. 2 [Future Records & Tapes]
  • 1990: Wind Me up Chuck, Vol. 3 [Raw Venture Records & Tapes]
  • 1991: 90's Goin' Hard
  • 1993: This Is a Journey into Time [live]
  • 1995: Hah Man
  • 1995: The Other Side - with Eva Cassidy (recorded in 1992 )
  • 1997: Live Pa Tape
  • 1998: Timeless
  • 1999: The Spirit of Christmas
  • 2001: Your Game...Live at the 9:30 Club
  • 2002: Put Your Hands Up!
  • 2005: Best of Chuck Brown (remastered)
  • 2007: We are About The Business (Raw Venture Records)
  • 2010: We Got This (Raw Venture Records)

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Art Blakey


Arthur "Art" Blakey (October 11, 1919 – October 16, 1990), known later as Abdullah Ibn Buhaina, was an American Grammy Award-winning jazz drummer and bandleader. He was a member of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.Jazz drummer Art Blakey grew up in a religious family, and he learned to play the piano in church. He gigged in Pittsburg clubs as a pianist, and later switched to the drums. Guided by swing drummer Chick Webb, Blakey developed great skill at the instrument, and he began to make a name for himself while performing with pianist and composer Mary Lou Williams.
In 1939, Blakey joined Fletcher Henderson’s band, and later played with bandleader Billy Eckstine. In that group, Blakey had the opportunity to play with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. He contributed to the development of the bebop style of drumming, pioneered by drummers Kenny Clarke and Max Roach. By the late 1940s, Blakey was one of the top drummers on the scene, playing with musicians such as Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk. In 1948, Blakey visited West Africa, where he was exposed to Islam and to the polyrhythms in African music. This visit had a profound impact on his life and work. He began to consider himself a Muslim, and took the name Abdullah Ibn Buhaina. He also sought to infuse bebop with a soulful and powerfully rhythmic drive, sewing the seeds of the hard bop style. In 1954, Blakey formed a quintet with pianist Horace Silver, bassist Curly Russel, saxophonist Lou Donaldson, and trumpeter Clifford Brown. They recorded the seminal album Live at Birdland, Vol. 1. This album marked the beginnings of the Jazz Messengers, which Blakey later dubbed his small ensembles. The Jazz Messengers became a pinnacle group of the 1950s and early sixties, and launched the careers of many legendary jazz musicians.
Blakey populated the Jazz Messengers with the most talented young musicians. At one time or another, his group included Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, and Benny Golson, and decades later, contemporary stars such as Wynton Marsalis, Terence Blanchard, and Kenny Garrett. Playing in Blakey’s group was practically a pre-requisite for becoming a serious jazz musician. Since Blakey didn’t compose very much, band members could hone their composing skills.

The Jazz Messengers continued in various forms throughout the decades, through peaks and valleys of critical and commercial success. Wynton Marsalis and the “Young Lions” of the 1980s and ‘90s, adopted Blakey’s emphasis on soulfulness and swing, which paved the way for the modern straight-ahead school of jazz.

Art Blakey died of lung cancer in 1990, just after his 71st birthday. To this day, his propulsive drumming style and the body of work he spurred by leading the Jazz Messengers are regarded as two essential elements of jazz history.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
as a leader :

1953
  • Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers(Birdland)
1954
1955
  • At the Cafe Bohemia(Blue Note)
1956
1957
  • Art Blakey & His Rhythm(Columbia)
  • Once Upon a Groove(Blue Note)
  • Ritual: The Modern Jazz Messengers(Blue Note)
  • Orgy in Rhythm(Blue Note) altrn
  • Mirage (Savoy)
  • Tough! (Cadet)
  • Reflections on Buhania (Elektra)
  • Jazz Messengers Play Lerner and Loewe (VIK)
  • Theory of Art (Bluebird/RCA
  • A Night in Tunisia (RCA/Bluebird)
  • Art Blakey/John Handy: Messages (Roulette)
  • Dawn on the Desert (Jubilee)
  • Midnight Session (Savoy)Flac
  • Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers Live (Calliope)
  • Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers (Bethlehem)
  • Art Blakey Big Band (Bethlehem)
  • Cu-Bop (Jubilee)
  • Second Edition (Bluebird/RCA)
1958
1959
  • Africaine(Blue Note)
  • At the Jazz Corner of the World (Blue Note)
  • Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Polygram)
  • Paris Concert: Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers (Portrait)
  • Live in Stockholm (Dragon)
  • Live in Copenhagen (Royal)
  • Paris Jam Session (EmArcy)
1960
1961

  • A Day with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers(Eastwind)
  • Live: Olympia 5-13-61(Trema)
  • Paris Jazz Concert (RTE)
  • A Jazz Hour with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers: Blues March (Movieplay)
  • Pisces(Blue Note)
  • Roots & Herbs(Blue Note)
  • The Witch Doctor(Blue Note)
  • The Freedom Rider(Blue Note)
  • Mosaic(Blue Note)
  • Buhaina's Delight(Blue Note)
  • Art Blakey!!!!! Jazz Messengers!!!!!(Impulse!)
1962
1963
  • Ugetsu(Riverside)
  • Selections from the Film: Golden Boy (Colpix)
  • A Jazz Message(Impulse!)
  • Blues Bag (Affinity)
1964
1965
  • 1965-Soul Finger(Limelight)
1966
1968
  • Art Blakey Live! (Trip)
1970
  • Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers (Catalyst)
1971
  • For Minors Only (WestWind)
1972
  • Vol. 1 Child's Dance
1973
  • Anthenagin (Prestige)
  • Buhaina ( Prestige)
  • Vol. 2 Mission Eternal
1976
1977
  • Gypsy Folk Tales (Roulette)
  • In My Prime(Timeless)
1978
  • Reflections in Blue(Timeless)
  • Live Messengers (recorded 1954, 1961, 1962)(Blue Note)
  • In This Korner (Concord Jazz)
1979
  • Night in Tunisia (Polygram)
  • One by One (Palcoscenico Records)
1980
  • Jazzbuhne Berlin '80 (Repertoire)
  • Live (Kingdom Jazz)
  • Art Blakey in Sweden (Evidence)
  • Live at Montreux and Northsea(Timeless)
1981
  • Album of the Year(Timeless)
  • Straight Ahead ( Concord Jazz)
  • Killer Joe: Art Blakey & George Kawaguchi (Storyville)
1982
1983
  • Aurex Jazz Festival '83 (East Worl
1984
  • Super Live ( Baystate)
  • New York Scene (Concord Jazz)
1985
  • Live at Ronnie Scott's (DRG)
  • Live at Sweet Basil (GNP)
  • Farewell (Paddle Wheel)
  • Buhaina: The Continuing Message (Affinity)
  • Live at Kimball's (Concord Jazz)
  • Hard Champion (Evidence)
  • Dr. Jeckyl (Evidence)
  • New Year's Eve at Sweet Basil (Evidence)
  • Blue Night(Timeless)
1986
  • Feeling Good (Delos)
1988
  • Standards (Paddle Wheel)
  • Not Yet(Soul Note)
  • I Get a Kick out of Bu(Soul Note)
1989
1990
  • Chippin' In(Timeless)
  • One for All (A&M)

as a sideman:

1944-1947

1947
1950
  • Sonny Stitt-Kaleidoscope
1951
1952
1953
  • Buddy De Franco - Mr. Clarinet
  • Kenny Drew Trio- New Faces, New Sounds
  • Gerry Mulligan With Chet Baker And Buddy DeFranco
  • Clifford Brown - Memorial Album
  • Paul Bley - Introducing
1954
  • Annie ROSS - King Pleasure Sings,Annie Ross Sings
  • Horace Silver-Safari
  • Thelonious Monk Trio-Thelonious Monk Trio
  • Joe Gordon - Early Sessions
  • Elmo Hope - Trio and Quintet
  • Thelonious Monk-Monk
  • Sonny Rollins - Moving Out
  • Thelonious Monk -The Complete Black Lion And Vogue Recordings
  • Thelonious Monk & Sonny Rollins
1955
  • Earl Bud Powell - Vol. 2-Burning In U.S.A.
  • Clark Terry - Swahili
  • Randy Weston - Solo, Duo & Trio
  • Kenny Dorham - Afro-Cuban
  • Julius Watkins - Julius Watkins Sextet Vols. 1 & 2
  • Hank Mobley Quartet
  • Herbie Nichols - The Prophetic Herbie Nichols, Vol. 1
  • Herbie Nichols - The Prophetic Herbie Nichols, Vol. 2
  • Duke Jordan - The Street Swingers
  • Gigi Gryce - Nica's Tempo
1956
  • Thelonious Monk - The Unique
  • Rita Reys - The Cool Voice Of Rita Reys
  • Stan Getz Special vol. 1
  • VA - 4 Lessons in Jazz
1957
  • Hank Mobley and His All Stars
  • Milt Jackson - Plenty, Plenty Soul
  • Jimmy Smith-A Date With Jimmy Smith
  • Jimmy Smith - The Sound Of Jimmy Smith
  • Jimmy Smith -At The Organ
  • Clifford Jordan & John Gilmore -Blowing in from Chicago
  • Hank Mobley Quintet
  • Johnny Griffin - A Blowin' Session
  • Thelonious Monk – Monks Music
  • Sonny Rollins Volume 2
  • John Coltrane-The Bethlehem Years
1958
1959
  • Blue Mitchell - Out Of The Blue
  • Various - New Blue Horns
  • Sonny Clark - My Conception
  • Kenny Burrell - On View At The Five Spot Cafet Cafe
  • Benny Golson-Groovin' With Golson
1960
  • Lee Morgan -Here's Lee Morgan
  • Hank Mobley - Soul Station
  • Dizzy Reece - Comin' On!
  • Lee Morgan-Lee-Way
  • Bobby Timmons - Soul Time
  • Wayne Shorter - Second Genesis
  • Art Blakey - Philly Joe Jones - Charlie Persip - Elvin Jones_Gretsch Drum Night At Birdland
  • Lee Morgan-Expoobident
  • Hank Mobley - Roll Call
  • Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter-The Complete Vee Jay Sessions
  • Gigi Gryce - Nica's Tempo
1961
  • Thelonious Monk With John Coltrane
1963
1964
  • Lee Morgan - Tom Cat
1971
  • Giants Of Jazz In Berlin' 71
  • Thelonious Monk-Something In Blue
  • Thelonious Monk-The Man I Love
  • Dizzy Gillespie & Thelonious Monk-Unissued In Europe
1972
  • Jimmy Smith jazz Set - More Jam Session and the Jimmy Smith jazz Set
  • Giants of Jazz-Giants of Jazz
1980
  • Wynton Marsalis - Best Of The Early Years
1988
  • Freddie Hubbard -Feel the Wind
1990
  • Bluesiana Triangle-Bluesiana Triangle


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Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Dorothy Ashby


Born Dorothy Jeanne Thompson, she grew up around music in Detroit where her father, guitarist Wiley Thompson, often brought home fellow jazz musicians. Even as a young girl, Dorothy would provide support and background to their music by playing the piano. She attended Cass Technical High School where fellow students included such future musical talents and jazz greats as Donald Byrd, Gerald Wilson, and Kenny Burrell. While in high school she played a number of instruments (including the saxophone and string bass) before coming upon the harp.

She attended Wayne State University in Detroit where she studied piano and music education. After she graduated, she began playing the piano in the jazz scene in Detroit, though by 1952 she had made the harp her main instrument. At first her fellow jazz musicians were resistant to the idea of adding the harp, which they perceived as an instrument of classical music and also somewhat ethereal in sound, into jazz performances. So Ashby overcame their initial resistance and built up support for the harp as a jazz instrument by organizing free shows and playing at dances and weddings with her trio. She recorded with Richard Davis, Jimmy Cobb, Frank Wess and others in the late 1950s and early 1960s. During the 1960s, she also had her own radio show in Detroit.

Ashby's trio, including her husband John Ashby on drums, regularly toured the country, recording albums for several different record labels. She played with Louis Armstrong and Woody Herman, among others. In 1962 Downbeat magazine's annual poll of best jazz performers included Ashby. Extending her range of interests and talents, she also worked with her husband on a theater company, the Ashby Players, which her husband founded in Detroit, and for which Dorothy often wrote the scores.

In the late 1960s, the Ashbys gave up touring and settled in California where Dorothy broke into the studio recording system as a harpist through the help of the soul singer Bill Withers, who recommended her to Stevie Wonder. As a result, Dorothy was called upon for a number of studio sessions playing for such popular recording artists as Dionne Warwick, Diana Ross, Earth, Wind & Fire, and Barry Manilow. Her harp playing is featured in the song “Come Live With Me' which is on the soundtrack for the 1967 movie, Valley of the Dolls. One of her more noteworthy performances in contemporary popular music was playing the harp on the song “If It's Magic” on Stevie Wonder's 1976 album Songs in the Key of Life. She is also featured on Bill Withers' 1974 album, +'Justments.

Her albums include The Jazz Harpist, In a Minor Groove, Hip Harp, Fantastic Jazz Harp of Dorothy Ashby with (Junior Mance), Django/Misty, Concerto De Aranjuez, Afro Harping, Dorothy's Harp, The Rubaiyat of Dorothy Ashby, and Music for Beautiful People. Between 1956-1970, she recorded 10 albums for such labels as Savoy, Cadet, Prestige, New Jazz, Argo, Jazzland and Atlantic. On her “Rubaiyat” album, Ashby played the Japanese musical instrument, the koto, demonstrating her talents on another instrument, and successfully integrating it into jazz.


Discography

  • The Jazz Harpist (1957)
  • In a Minor Groove (1958)
  • Hip Harp (1958)
  • Soft Winds (1961)
  • Dorothy Ashby (1962)
  • The Fantastic Jazz Harp of Dorothy Ashby (1965)
  • Afro Harping (1968)
  • Dorothy Plays For Beautiful People (1969)
  • Dorothy's Harp (1969)
  • The Rubaiyat of Dorothy Ashby (1970)
  • Django/Misty (1984)
  • Concierto de Aranjuez (1984)

The Jazz Crusaders (a.k.a. The Crusaders)



The Crusaders were formed in 1960 in Houston, Texas, U.S.A.

The group comprised of:

Joe Sample (b. Joseph Leslie 'Joe' Sample, 1st February 1939, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. - keyboards)
Wilton Felder (b. Wilton Lewis Felder, 31st August 1940, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. - tenor sax)
Stix Hooper (b. Nesbert 'Stix' Hooper, 15th August 1938, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. - drums)
Robert 'Pops' Popwell (b. Robert Popwell, 29th December 1950, Daytona, Florida, U.S.A. - bass guitar)
Wayne Henderson (b. 24th September 1939, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. - trombone)

The Crusaders hail from Houston in Texas. Since 1961, the group (under various names) have released more than forty albums, 19 of which were recorded under the name 'The Jazz Crusaders' (in betweeen 1961 and 1970). In 1954, keyboards player, Joe Sample teamed up with high-school friends, tenor saxophonist Wilton Felder and drummer Stix Hooper to, originally, form the Swingsters. The group first played together in high school before relocating to Los Angeles in the early '60's. As the Swingsters, they were joined by trombonist Wayne Henderson, flautist Hubert Laws, and bassist Henry Wilson and the group became the Modern Jazz Sextet. The group then changed their name to the Jazz Crusaders.

The Jazz Crusaders signed with the Pacific Jazz label, where they remained for a decade, before simplifying their name to the Crusaders in 1971. Their Early Pacific Jazz albums included 'Freedom Sound', 'Lookin Ahead', 'At The Lighthouse' and 'Tough Talk'. The Crusaders first album was entitled 'Pass The Plate' for the Chisa imprint, which was followed by a label change, to Blue Thumb/ABC, and a second album release, confusingly entitled 'Crusaders 1'. In 1972, they released '2nd Crusade', followed by 'Hollywood' (in 1973), 'Unsung Heroes' (in 1973) and 'Scratch' (in 1974). By 1974, they had incorporated the electric bass and electric guitar into their music. Bass guitarist 'Pops' Popwell and guitarist Larry Carlton joined the band, and featured on the group's albums throughout the latter part of the 1970's. They developed a more crossover, jazz-funk style of appeal, and the group's recordings started to appear on the Billboard pop charts.

Joe Sample performed various extra curricular performances for many Soul artists, along with some soft Rock artists including Joni Mitchell ('Free Man In Paris'). Further albums, 'Southern Comfort' (in 1974), 'Chain Reaction' (in 1975, including 'I Felt The Love'), and 'Those Southern Knights' (in 1976, including 'Spiral' and 'Keep That Same Old Feeling') were released before Wayne Henderson left the group to pursue solo recordings and production activities. The Crusaders recorded two more ABC albums, 'Free As The Wind' (1977) and 'Images' (1978) before the label merged with MCA. Pops Powell then left the group, and the Crusaders began to introduce vocals into their recordings.

The height of the group's commercial success came with 1979's 'Street Life', which peaked at number 18 on the pop album charts, and the title track from the album made the Top 10 on the R & B chart and number 36 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart. The song featured the vocals of Randy Crawford, whose album 'Now We May Begin' the group produced and played on in 1980. Also in 1980 they employed the vocal skills of Bill Withers on 'Soul Shadows' for their new album 'Rhapsody & Blues'. In 1981, 'I'm So Glad I'm Standing Here Today' featuring the vocals of Joe Cocker, reached the U.K. Top 75. In 1982 the Crusaders produced 'Don't Take Your Love To Hollywood' for Kelly Marie. Another founding member, Stix Hooper, left the group in 1983 and three more albums were recorded in the mid-1980's. Stix Hoopper was replaced with drummer Ndugu, and returned with the album 'Ghetto Blaster' in 1984, (including 'Night Ladies' - U.K. Top 75).

In the meantime Will and Joe both recorded solo albums. Ndugu performed on a final Crusaders album for MCA, 'The Good And Bad Times', which was released in 1986, and included 'The Way It Goes' featuring Nancy Wilson. In 1988, the group released 'Life In THe Modern World', that featured vocal and writing contributions from Ivan Lins ('Life In The Modern World' and 'Some People Never Learn') and Lamont Dozier ('Let Me Prove Myself Tonight'). In the 1990's, the group, for the most part, had disbanded. Wayne Henderson and Wilton Felder did, however, have a reunion as the Crusaders. In 2003, founding members Joe Sample, Wilton Felder and Stix Hooper revived The Crusaders and released 'Rural Renewal'. Ray Parker Jr. and Eric Clapton played guitar on the album. Also in 2003, a Wayne Henderson-led Jazz Crusaders released 'Soul Axess'. The Jazz Crusaders have released six albums since 1995. Joe Sample is still pursuing a successful solo career, and is recording again with Randy Crawford (two albums in 2006 and 2008 respectively).

Discography

as the Jazz Crusaders:


as the Crusaders:
Compilations:

The Vocal Album (1987)

Friday, October 28, 2011

Nina Simone






Eunice Kathleen Waymon (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), better known by her stage name Nina Simone , was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music. Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.
Born the sixth child of a preacher's family in North Carolina, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist as a child. Her musical path changed direction after she was denied a scholarship to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, despite a well-received audition. Simone was later told by someone working at Curtis that she was rejected because she was black. She then began playing in a small club in Philadelphia to fund her continuing musical education to become a classical pianist and was required to sing as well. She was approached for a recording by Bethlehem Records, and her rendition of "I Loves You Porgy" became a smash hit in the United States in 1958. Over the length of her career, Simone recorded more than 40 albums, mostly between 1958 — when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue — and 1974.
Her musical style arose from a fusion of gospel and pop songs with classical music, in particular with influences from her first inspiration, Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied with her expressive jazz-like singing in her characteristic low tenor. She injected as much of her classical background into her music as possible to give it more depth and quality, as she felt that pop music was inferior to classical. Her intuitive grasp on the audience-performer relationship was gained from a unique background of playing piano accompaniment for church revivals and sermons regularly from the early age of six years.
After 20 years of performing, she became involved in the civil rights movement and the direction of her life shifted once again. Simone's music was highly influential in the fight for equal rights in the US
Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina. The sixth of eight children in a poor family, she began playing piano at age three; the first song she learned was "God Be With You, Till We Meet Again". Demonstrating a talent with the instrument, she performed at her local church, but her concert debut, a classical recital, was given when she was twelve. Simone later claimed that during this performance her parents, who had taken seats in the front row, were forced to move to the back of the hall to make way for white people. Simone said she refused to play until her parents were moved back to the front, and that the incident contributed to her later involvement in the civil rights movement.
Simone's mother, Mary Kate Waymon, was a strict Methodist minister and a housemaid. Simone's father, John Divine Waymon, was a handyman who at one time owned a dry cleaning business, but who also suffered bouts of ill health. Mary Kate's employer, hearing of her daughter's talent, provided funds for piano lessons. Subsequently, a local fund was set up to assist in Simone's continued education. With the assistance of this scholarship money she attended high school.
After finishing high school, she had studied for an interview with the help of a private tutor to study piano further at the Curtis Institute, but she was rejected. Simone believed that this rejection was related directly to her race. Simone then moved to New York City, where she studied at the Juilliard School of Music.
To fund her private lessons, Simone performed at the Midtown Bar & Grill on Pacific Avenue in Atlantic City, whose owner insisted that she sing as well as play the piano. In 1954 she adopted the stage name Nina Simone. "Nina" (from niña, meaning 'little girl' in Spanish) was a nickname a boyfriend had given to her, and "Simone" was taken from the French actress Simone Signoret, whom she had seen in the movie Casque d'or. Simone's mixture of jazz, blues, and classical music in her performances at the bar earned her a small, but loyal, fan base.
In 1958, she befriended and married Don Ross, a beatnik who worked as a fairground barker, but quickly regretted their marriage. After playing in small clubs, in 1958 she recorded a rendition of George Gershwin's "I Loves You Porgy" (from Porgy and Bess), which she learned from a Billie Holiday album and performed as a favor to a friend. It became her only Billboard top 40 success in the United States, and her debut album Little Girl Blue soon followed on Bethlehem Records. Simone missed out on more than $1 million in royalties (mainly because of the successful re-release of My Baby Just Cares for Me during the 1980s) and never benefited financially from the album, because she had sold her rights to it for $3,000.
After the success of Little Girl Blue, Simone signed a contract with Colpix Records, and recorded a string of studio and live albums. Colpix relinquished all creative control to her, including the choice of material that would be recorded, in exchange for her signing the contract with them. At this point, Simone only performed pop music to make money to continue her classical music studies, and was indifferent about having a recording contract. She kept this attitude toward the record industry for most of her career.
Simone married a New York police detective, Andrew Stroud, in 1961; Stroud later became her manager
In 1964, she changed record distributors, from the American Colpix to the Dutch Philips, which also meant a change in the contents of her recordings. Simone had always included songs in her repertoire that drew upon her African-American origins (such as "Brown Baby" and "Zungo" on Nina at the Village Gate in 1962). On her debut album for Philips, Nina Simone In Concert (live recording, 1964), however, Simone for the first time openly addressed the racial inequality that was prevalent in the United States with the song "Mississippi Goddam", her response to the murder of Medgar Evers and the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four black children. The song was released as a single, and it was boycotted in certain southern states. "Old Jim Crow", on the same album, addressed the Jim Crow Laws.
From then on, a civil rights message was standard in Simone's recording repertoire, becoming a part of her live performances. Simone performed and spoke at many civil rights meetings, such as at the Selma to Montgomery marches.Simone advocated violent revolution during the civil rights period, rather than Martin Luther King's non-violent approach, and she hoped that African Americans could, by armed combat, form a separate state. Nevertheless, she wrote in her autobiography that she and her family regarded all races as equal.
She covered Billie Holiday's "Strange Fruit", a song about the lynching of black men in the South, on Pastel Blues (1965). She also sang the W. Cuney poem "Images" on Let It All Out (1966), about the absence of pride she saw among African-American women. Simone wrote "Four Women", a song about four different stereotypes of African-American women, and included the recording on her 1966 album Wild Is the Wind.
Simone moved from Philips to RCA Victor during 1967. She sang "Backlash Blues", written by her friend Langston Hughes on her first RCA album, Nina Simone Sings The Blues (1967). On Silk & Soul (1967), she recorded Billy Taylor's "I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free" and "Turning Point". The album Nuff Said (1968) contains live recordings from the Westbury Music Fair, April 7, 1968, three days after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. She dedicated the whole performance to him and sang "Why? (The King Of Love Is Dead)", a song written by her bass player, Gene Taylor, directly after the news of King's death had reached them. In the summer of 1969 she performed at the Harlem Cultural Festival in Harlem's Mount Morris Park.
Together with Weldon Irvine, Simone turned the late Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished play To Be Young, Gifted, and Black into a civil rights song. Hansberry had been a personal friend whom Simone credited with cultivating her social and political consciousness. She performed the song live on the album Black Gold (1970). A studio recording was released as a single, and renditions of the song have been recorded by Aretha Franklin (on her 1972 album Young, Gifted and Black) and by Donny Hathaway.
Simone left the United States in September 1970, flying to Barbados and expecting Stroud to communicate with her when she had to perform again. However, Stroud interpreted Simone's sudden disappearance, and the fact that she had left behind her wedding ring, as an indication of a desire for a divorce. As her manager, Stroud was in charge of Simone's income.
When Simone returned to the United States she learned that a warrant had been issued for her arrest for unpaid taxes (as a protest against her country's involvement with the Vietnam War), causing her to return to Barbados again to evade the authorities and prosecution.Simone stayed in Barbados for quite some time and she had a lengthy affair with the Prime Minister, Errol Barrow.[[25] A close friend, singer Miriam Makeba, then persuaded her to go to Liberia. After that she lived in Switzerland and the Netherlands, before settling in France during 1992.
She recorded her last album for RCA Records, It Is Finished, during 1974. Simone did not make another record until 1978, when she was persuaded to go into the recording studio by CTI Records owner Creed Taylor. The result was the album Baltimore, which, while not a commercial success, did get good reviews and marked a quiet artistic renaissance in Simone's recording output. Her choice of material retained its eclecticism, ranging from spiritual songs to Hall & Oates' "Rich Girl". Four years later Simone recorded Fodder On My Wings on a French label. During the 1980s Simone performed regularly at Ronnie Scott's jazz club in London, where she recorded the album Live at Ronnie Scott's in 1984. Although her early on-stage style could be somewhat haughty and aloof, in later years, Simone particularly seemed to enjoy engaging her audiences sometimes by recounting humorous anecdotes related to her career and music and by soliciting requests. In 1987, the original 1958 recording of "My Baby Just Cares For Me" was used in a commercial for Chanel No. 5 perfume in the United Kingdom. This led to a re-release of the recording, which stormed to number 4 on the UK's NME singles chart, giving her a brief surge in popularity in the UK. Her autobiography, I Put a Spell on You, was published in 1992. She recorded her last album, A Single Woman, in 1993.
In 1993, Simone settled near Aix-en-Provence in Southern France. She had suffered from breast cancer for several years before she died in her sleep at her home in Carry-le-Rouet, Bouches-du-Rhône on April 21, 2003. (In addition, Simone received a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in the late 1980s. Her funeral service was attended by singers Miriam Makeba and Patti Labelle, poet Sonia Sanchez, actor Ossie Davis, and hundreds of others. Elton John sent a floral tribute with the message "You were the greatest and I love you".[ Simone's ashes were scattered in several African countries. She left behind a daughter, Lisa Celeste Stroud, an actress and singer, who took the stage name Simone, and has appeared on Broadway in Aida.

Discography(Studio&Lives):



1958 Little Girl Blue (Studio) Bethlehem Records part 1 part 2
1959 Nina Simone and Her Friends (Studio) Bethlehem Records
1959 The Amazing Nina Simone (Studio) Colpix Records altrn
1959 Nina Simone at Town Hall (Live and studio) Colpix Records altrn
1960 Nina Simone at Newport (Live) Colpix Records part 1 part 2
1960 Forbidden Fruit (Studio) Colpix Records
1962 Nina at the Village Gate (Live) Colpix Records part 1 part 2
1962 Nina Simone Sings Ellington (Live) Colpix Records
1963 Nina Simone at Carnegie Hall (Live) Colpix Records
1964 Folksy Nina (Live) Colpix Records
1964 Nina Simone in Concert (Live) Philips Records altrn
1964 Broadway-Blues-Ballads (Studio) Philips Records altrn
1965 I Put a Spell on You (Studio) Philips Records
1965 Pastel Blues (Studio) Philips Records altrn
1966 Nina Simone with Strings (Studio) (strings added) Colpix
1966 Let It All Out (Live and studio) Philips
1966 Wild Is the Wind (Studio) Philips
1967 High Priestess of Soul (Studio) Philips
1967 Nina Simone Sings the Blues (Studio) RCA Records
1967 Silk & Soul (Studio) RCA Records altrn
1968 Nuff Said (Live and studio) RCA Records
1969 Nina Simone and Piano (Studio) RCA Records
1969 To Love Somebody (Studio) RCA Records
1970 Black Gold (Live) RCA Records
1971 Here Comes the Sun (Studio) RCA Records
1972 Emergency Ward (Live and Studio) RCA Records altrn
1974 It Is Finished (Live) RCA Records
1978 Baltimore (Studio) CTI Records
1982 Fodder on My Wings (Studio) Carrere
1984 Backlash (Live) StarJazz
1985 Nina's Back (Studio) VPI
1985 Live & Kickin (Live) VPI
1987 Let It Be Me (Live) Verve
1987 Live at Ronnie Scott's (Live) Hendring-Wadham
1993 A Single Woman
(Studio) Elektra Records


Compilation:

2000 The Essential Nina Simone" (compilation, RCA, ) FLAC



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