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Showing posts with label Post-Bop. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Post-Bop. Show all posts

Friday, March 23, 2012

The Legendary Max Roach



Born: January 10, 1925 | Died: August 16, 2007 Instrument: Drums

Maxwell Lemuel Roach is a percussionist, drummer, and jazz composer. He has worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Sonny Rollins. He is widely considered to be one of the most important drummers in the history of jazz.

Roach was born in Newland, North Carolina, to Alphonse and Cressie Roach; his family moved to Brooklyn, New York when he was 4 years old. He grew up in a musical context, his mother being a gospel singer, and he started to play bugle in parade orchestras at a young age. At the age of 10, he was already playing drums in some gospel bands. He performed his first big-time gig in New York City at the age of sixteen, substituting for Sonny Greer in a performance with the Duke Ellington Orchestra.



In 1942, Roach started to go out in the jazz clubs of the 52nd Street and at 78th Street & Broadway for Georgie Jay's Taproom (playing with schoolmate Cecil Payne). He was one of the first drummers (along with Kenny Clarke) to play in the bebop style, and performed in bands led by Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, Bud Powell, and Miles Davis.

Roach played on many of Parker's most important records, including the Savoy 1945 session, a turning point in recorded jazz.

Two children, son Daryl and daughter Maxine, were born from his first marriage with Mildred Roach. In 1954 he met singer Barbara Jai (Johnson) and had another son, Raoul Jordu.



He continued to play as a freelance while studying composition at the Manhattan School of Music. He graduated in 1952.

During the period 1962-1970, Roach was married to the singer Abbey Lincoln, who had performed on several of Roach's albums. Twin daughters, Ayodele and Dara Rasheeda, were later born to Roach and his third wife, Janus Adams Roach.

Long involved in jazz

education, in 1972 he joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

In the early 2000s, Roach became less active owing to the onset of hydrocephalus-related complications.

Renowned all throughout his performing life, Roach has won an extraordinary array of honors. He was one of the first to be given a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, cited as a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters in France, twice awarded the French Grand Prix du Disque, elected to the International Percussive Society's Hall of Fame and the Downbeat Magazine Hall of Fame, awarded Harvard Jazz Master, celebrated by Aaron Davis Hall, given eight honorary doctorate degrees, including degrees awarded by the University of Bologna, Italy and Columbia University.



In 1952 Roach co-founded Debut Records with bassist Charles Mingus. This label released a record of a concert, billed and widely considered as “the greatest concert ever,” called Jazz at Massey Hall, featuring Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Mingus and Roach. Also released on this label was the groundbreaking bass-and- drum free improvisation, Percussion Discussion.

In 1954, he formed a quintet featuring trumpeter Clifford Brown, tenor saxophonist Harold Land, pianist Richie Powell (brother of Bud Powell), and bassist George Morrow, though Land left the following year and Sonny Rollins replaced him. The group was a prime example of the hard bop style also played by Art Blakey and Horace Silver. Tragically, this group was to be short-lived; Brown and Powell were killed in a car accident on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in June 1956. After Brown and Powell's deaths, Roach continued leading a similarly configured group, with Kenny Dorham (and later the short-lived Booker Little) on trumpet, George Coleman on tenor and pianist Ray Bryant. Roach expanded the standard form of hard-bop using 3/4 waltz rhythms and modality in 1957 with his album Jazz in 3/4 time. During this period, Roach recorded a series of other albums for the EmArcy label featuring the brothers Stanley and Tommy Turrentine.



In 1960 he composed the “We Insist! - Freedom Now” suite with lyrics by Oscar Brown Jr., after being invited to contribute to commemorations of the hundredth anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Using his musical abilities to comment on the African-American experience would be a significant part of his career. Unfortunately, Roach suffered from being blacklisted by the American recording industry for a period in the 1960s. In 1966 with his album Drums Unlimited (which includes several tracks that are entirely drums solos) he proved that drums can be a solo instrument able to play theme, variations, rhythmically cohesive phrases. He described his approach to music as “the creation of organized sound.”

Among the many important records Roach has made is the classic Money Jungle 1962, with Mingus and Duke Ellington. This is generally regarded as one of the very finest trio albums ever made.

During the 70s, Roach formed a unique musical organization--”M'Boom”--a percussion orchestra. Each member of this unit composed for it and performed on many percussion instruments. Personnel included Fred King, Joe Chambers, Warren Smith, Freddie Waits, Roy Brooks, Omar Clay, Ray Mantilla, Francisco Mora, and Eli Fountain.

Not content to expand on the musical territory he had already become known for, Roach spent the decades of the 80s and 90s continually finding new ways to express his musical expression and presentation.



In the early 80s, he began presenting entire concerts solo, proving that this multi-percussion instrument, in the hands of such a great master, could fulfill the demands of solo performance and be entirely satisfying to an audience. He created memorable compositions in these solo concerts; a solo record was released by Bay State, a Japanese label, just about impossible to obtain. One of these solo concerts is available on video, which also includes a filming of a recording date for Chattahoochee Red, featuring his working quartet, Odean Pope, Cecil Bridgewater and Calvin Hill.

He embarked on a series of duet recordings. Departing from the style of presentation he was best known for, most of the music on these recordings is free improvisation, created with the avant-garde musicians Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Archie Shepp, Abdullah Ibrahim and Connie Crothers. He created duets with other performers: a recorded duet with the oration by Martin Luther King, “I Have a Dream”; a duet with video artist Kit Fitzgerald, who improvised video imagery while Roach spontaneously created the music; a classic duet with his life-long friend and associate Dizzy Gillespie; a duet concert recording with Mal Waldron.



He wrote music for theater, such as plays written by Sam Shepard, presented at La Mama E.T.C. in New York City.

He found new contexts for presentation, creating unique musical ensembles. One of these groups was “The Double Quartet.” It featured his regular performing quartet, with personnel as above, except Tyrone Brown replacing Hill; this quartet joined with “The Uptown String Quartet,” led by his daughter Maxine Roach, featuring Diane Monroe, Lesa Terry and Eileen Folson.

Another ensemble was the “So What Brass Quintet,” a group comprised of five brass instrumentalists and Roach, no chordal instrumnent, no bass player. Much of the performance consisted of drums and horn duets. The ensemble consisted of two trumpets, trombone, French horn and tuba. Musicians included Cecil Bridgewater, Frank Gordon, Eddie Henderson, Steve Turre, Delfeayo Marsalis, Robert Stewart, Tony Underwood, Marshall Sealy, and Mark Taylor.



Roach presented his music with orchestras and gospel choruses. He performed a concerto with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He wrote for and performed with the Walter White gospel choir and the John Motley Singers. Roach performed with dancers: the Alvin Aily Dance Company, the Dianne McIntyre Dance Company, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.

In the early 80s, Roach surprised his fans by performing in a hip hop concert, featuring the artist-rapper Fab Five Freddy and the New York Break Dancers. He expressed the insight that there was a strong kinship between the outpouring of expression of these young black artists and the art he had pursued all his life.

During all these years, while he ventured into new territory during a lifetime of innovation, he kept his contact with his musical point of origin. His last recording, “Friendship”, was with trumpet master Clark Terry, the two long-standing friends in duet and quartet.

Link to Article: All About Jazz

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Discography
As leader

  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet (Fantasy)
  • 1953 : Max Roach and his Sextet (Debut)
  • 1953 : Max Roach Quartet featuring Hank Mobley (Debut)
  • 1956 : Max Roach + 4 (EmArcy)
  • 1957 : Jazz in ¾ Time
  • 1957-60 : Conte Candoli & Max Roach - Drummin' The Blues & Jazz Structures
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Art Blakey (with Art Blakey)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four at Newport (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max Roach Plus Four on the Chicago Scene (Mercury)
  • 1958 : Max!
  • 1958 : Max Roach with the Boston Percussion Ensemble (EmArcy)
  • 1958 : Deeds not Words (aka Conversation) (Riverside)
  • 1958 : Max Roach/Bud Shank - Sessions (with Bud Shank)
  • 1958 : The Defiant Ones (with Booker Little)
  • 1958 : Deeds, Not Words (with all new cast Ray Draper, Booker Little, George Coleman)
  • 1959 : Rich Versus Roach (with Buddy Rich)
  • 1959 : A Little Sweet (aka. The Many Sides of Max ) (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Award-Winning Drummer (Time T)
  • 1960 : We Insist! (Candid)
  • 1960 : Max Roach + 4 - As Quiet As Kept
  • 1961 : Percussion Bitter Sweet (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1962 : Speak, Brother, Speak!
  • 1962 : It's Time (Impulse! Records)(with Mal Waldron)
  • 1964 : The Max Roach Trio Featuring the Legendary Hasaan (with Hasaan ibn Ali)
  • 1966 : Drums Unlimited (Atlantic) (Leader, with James Spaulding, Freddie Hubbard, Ronnie Mathews, Jymie Merritt, Roland Alexander)
  • 1968 : Sound as Roach (Atlantic)
  • 1968 : Members, Don't Git Weary (Atlantic
  • 1971 : Lift Every Voice and Sing (with J.C. White Singers)
  • 1976 : Force: Sweet Mao-Suid Afrika '76 (duo with Archie Shepp)
  • 1976 : Percussion Discussion (with Art Blakey)
  • 1976 : Nommo (Victor)
  • 1977 : The Loudstar (Horo)
  • 1977 : Solos (Baystate)
  • 1977 : Streams of Consciousness - duo with Dollar Brand
  • 1978 : Confirmation (Fluid Records)
  • 1978 : Birth and Rebirth - duo with Anthony Braxton (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : The Long March - duo with Archie Shepp (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Historic Concerts - duo with Cecil Taylor (Black Saint)
  • 1979 : One in Two - Two in One - duo with Anthony Braxton (Hathut)
  • 1979 : Pictures in a Frame (Soul Note)
  • 1980 : Chattahoochee Red (Columbia)
  • 1982 : Swish - duo with Connie Crothers (New Artists)
  • 1982 : In the Light (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Scott Free (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : It's Christmas Again (Soul Note)
  • 1984 : Survivors (Soul Note)
  • 1985 : Easy Winners (Soul Note)
  • 1986 : Bright Moments (Soul Note)
  • 1989 : Max + Dizzy: Paris 1989 - duo with Dizzy Gillespie (A&M)
  • 1991 : To the Max! (Enja)
  • 1995 : Max Roach With The New Orchestra Of Boston And The So What Brass Quintet (Blue Note)
  • 1999 : Beijing Trio (Asian Improv)
  • 2002 : Friendship - with Clark Terry) (Columbia)

With Clifford Brown

  • 1954 : Brown And Roach Incorporated
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach
  • 1954 : Jam Session
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Original Master Recording)
  • 1954 : Clifford Brown & The Max Roach Quartet - Historic California Concert
  • 1954 : Daahoud (Mainstream-Audiofidelity Japan)
  • 1954 : Study in Brown
  • 1954 : More Study in Brown
  • 1955 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1956 : Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street
  • 1957 : Clifford Brown with Strings
  • 1979 : Live at the Bee Hive (Columbia Records)

With M'Boom

  • 1973 : Re: Percussion (Strata-East Records)
  • 1979 : M'Boom (Columbia)
  • 1984 : Collage (Soul Note)
  • 1992 : Live at S.O.B.'s New York (Blue Moon Records)

Live Albums and Bootlegs
  • 1964 : Live in Europe: Freedom Now Suite (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Tokyo (Denon)
  • 1977 : Max Roach Quartet Live In Amsterdam - It's Time (Baystate)
  • 1978 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Milan
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Anthony Braxton Live in Alassio
  • 1978 : Max Roach and Archie Shepp Live in Milan [info]
  • 1979 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Frankfurt
  • 1979 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Alassio
  • 1981 : D.Gillespie/J.Moody/M.Roach feat. WDR Big Band - Live in Moers "Charlie Parker Memorial Concert"
  • 1981 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Rome [info]
  • 1982 : M'Boom Re:Percussion Live in Milan [info]
  • 1983 : Live at Vielharmonie (Soul Note)
  • 1990 : Max Roach Quartet Live in Berlin [info]

As sideman

  • 1944 : Rainbow Mist (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1944 : Coleman Hawkins and His All Stars (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1945 : Town Hall, New York, June 22, 1945 (with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker)
  • 1945 - 1948: The Complete Savoy Studio Recordings (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1946 : Mad Be Bop (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1946 : Opus BeBop (with Stan Getz)
  • 1946 : Savoy Jam Party (Don Byas Quartet)
  • 1946 : The Hawk Flies (with Coleman Hawkins)
  • 1947 : The Bud Powell Trip (with Bud Powell)
  • 1947 : Lullaby in Rhythm (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Charlie Parker on Dial (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1947 : Miles Davis - First Miles (with Charlie Parker and Miles Davis)
  • 1947 : Dexter Rides Again (with Dexter Gordon)
  • 1948 : The Band that Never Was (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird on 52nd Street (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1948 : Bird at the Roost (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Birth of the Cool (with Miles Davis)
  • 1949 - 1953: Charlie Parker – Complete Sessions on Verve (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Charlie Parker in France (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1949 : Genesis (with Sonny Stitt)
  • 1949 : The Stars of Modern Jazz at Carnegie Hall
  • 1950 : The McGhee-Navarro Sextet (with Howard McGhee)
  • 1951 : The Amazing Bud Powell (with Bud Powell)
  • 1951 : The George Wallington Trip and Septet (with George Wallington)
  • 1951 : Conception (with Miles Davis)
  • 1952 : New Faces, New Sounds (with Gil Melle)
  • 1952 : The Complete Genius (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1952 : The Quintet - Jazz At Massey Hall (Debut Records)
  • 1952 : Live at Rockland Palace (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : The Metronome All Starss. MGM (with Billy Eckstine)
  • 1953 : Chet Baker and Miles Davis with the Lighthouse All-Stars
  • 1953 : Mambo Jazz (with Joe Holiday)
  • 1953 : Yardbird: DC-53 (with Charlie Parker)
  • 1953 : Cohn's Tones (with Al Cohn)
  • 1953 : Diz and Getz (with Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Getz)
  • 1954 : Dinah Jams Featuring Dinah Washington
  • 1955 : Relaxed Piano Moods (with Hazel Scott)
  • 1955 : Introducing Jimmy Cleveland And His All Stars (EmArcy)
  • 1955 : New Piano Expressions (with John Dennis)
  • 1955 : Herbie Nichols Trio (with Herbie Nichols)
  • 1955 : Work Time (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1955 : The Charles Mingus Quartet plus Max Roach (with Charles Mingus)
  • 1956 : Sonny Rollins Plus 4 (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Sonny Boy (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : Introducing Johnny Griffin (with Johnny Griffin)
  • 1956 : The Magnificent Thad Jones (with Thad Jones)
  • 1956 : Brilliant Corners (with Thelonious Monk)
  • 1956 : Tour de Force (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1956 : The Music of George Gershwin: I Sing of Thee (with Joe Wilder)
  • 1956 : Rollins Plays for Bird (Sonny Rollins Quintet)
  • 1956 : Saxophone Colossus (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1957 : First Place (with J.J. Johnson)
  • 1957 : Sonny Clark Trio
  • 1957 : Jazz Contrasts (with Kenny Dorham)
  • 1957 : Abby Lincoln - That's Him
  • 1958: Booker Little 4 and Max Roach (United Artist)
  • 1958 : Freedom Suite (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1958 : Shadow Waltz (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1959 : Moon-Faced and Starry-Eyed (Mercury)
  • 1959 : Aix En Providence (with Sonny Rollins)
  • 1960 : Quiet as it's Kept (Mercury)
  • 1960 : Tommy Turrentine (with Tommy Turrentine)
  • 1960 : Stan 'The Man' Turrentine
  • 1960 : Again! (Affinity)
  • 1960 : Parisian Sketches (Mercury)
  • 1960 : We Insist! Freedom Now Suite (Candid)
  • 1960 : Long as You're Living (Enja)
  • 1960 : Uhuru Afrika (with Randy Weston)
  • 1960 : Sonny Clark Trio (with Sonny Clark)
  • 1961 : Straight Ahead (with Abbey Lincoln)
  • 1961 : Out Front (with Booker Little)
  • 1961 : Paris Blues (with Duke Ellington)
  • 1962 : Money Jungle (with Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus)
  • 1962 : Drum Suite (with Slide Hampton)
  • 1966 : Stuttgart 1963 Concert (with Sonny Rollins
  • 1972 : Newport in New York ‘72 (Roach on 2 tracks only)
  • 1975 : The Bop Session (with Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, John Lewis, Hank Jones and Percy Heath)
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Thursday, May 27, 2010

Freddie Hubbard



Frederick Dewayne "Freddie" Hubbard
(April 7, 1938 – December 29, 2008) was an American jazz trumpeter. He was known primarily for playing in the bebop, hard bop and post bop styles from the early 1960s and on. His unmistakable and influential tone contributed to new perspectives for modern jazz and bebop.

Hubbard started playing the mellophone and trumpet in his school band, studying at the Jordan Conservatory with the principal trumpeter of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. In his teens Hubbard worked locally with brothers Wes and Monk Montgomery and worked with bassist Larry Ridley and saxophonist James Spaulding. In 1958, at the age of 20, he moved to New York, and began playing with some of the best jazz players of the era, including Philly Joe Jones, Sonny Rollins, Slide Hampton, Eric Dolphy, J. J. Johnson, and Quincy Jones. In June 1960 Hubbard made his first record as a leader, Open Sesame, with saxophonist Tina Brooks, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Clifford Jarvis.
In December 1960, Hubbard was invited to play on Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz after Coleman had heard him playing with Don Cherry.
Then in May 1961, Hubbard played on Olé Coltrane, John Coltrane's final recording session with Atlantic Records. Together with Eric Dolphy, Hubbard was the only 'session' musician who appeared on both Olé and Africa/Brass, Coltrane's first album with ABC/Impulse! Later, in August 1961, Hubbard made one of his most famous records, Ready for Freddie, which was also his first collaboration with saxophonist Wayne Shorter. Hubbard joined Shorter later in 1961 when he replaced Lee Morgan in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. He played on several Blakey recordings, including Caravan, Ugetsu, Mosaic, and Free For All. Hubbard remained with Blakey until 1966, leaving to form the first of several small groups of his own, which featured, among others, pianist Kenny Barron and drummer Louis Hayes.
It was during this time that he began to develop his own sound, distancing himself from the early influences of Clifford Brown and Morgan, and won the Downbeat jazz magazine "New Star" award on trumpet.
Throughout the 1960s Hubbard played as a sideman on some of the most important albums from that era, including, Oliver Nelson's The Blues and the Abstract Truth, Eric Dolphy's Out to Lunch, Herbie Hancock's Maiden Voyage, and Wayne Shorter's Speak No Evil. He recorded extensively for Blue Note Records in the 1960s: eight albums as a bandleader, and twenty-eight as a sideman. Hubbard was described as "the most brilliant trumpeter of a generation of musicians who stand with one foot in 'tonal' jazz and the other in the atonal camp". Though he never fully embraced the free jazz of the '60s, he appeared on two of its landmark albums: Coleman's Free Jazz and Coltrane's Ascension.
Hubbard achieved his greatest popular success in the 1970s with a series of albums for Creed Taylor and his record label CTI Records, overshadowing Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws, and George Benson.. Although his early 1970s jazz albums Red Clay, First Light, Straight Life, and Sky Dive were particularly well received and considered among his best work, the albums he recorded later in the decade were attacked by critics for their commercialism. First Light won a 1972 Grammy Award and included pianists Herbie Hancock and Richard Wyands, guitarists Eric Gale and George Benson, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, and percussionist Airto Moreira. In 1994, Freddie, collaborating with Chicago jazz vocalist/co-writer Catherine Whitney, had lyrics set to the music of First Light.
In 1977 Hubbard joined with Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Ron Carter and Wayne Shorter, members of the mid-sixties Miles Davis Quintet, for a series of performances. Several live recordings of this group were released as VSOP, VSOP: The Quintet, VSOP: Tempest in the Colosseum (all 1977) and VSOP: Live Under the Sky (1979).
Hubbard's trumpet playing was featured on the track Zanzibar, on the 1978 Billy Joel album 52nd Street (the 1979 Grammy Award Winner for Best Album). The track ends with a fade during Hubbard's performance. An "unfaded" version was released on the 2004 Billy Joel box set My Lives.
In the 1980s Hubbard was again leading his own jazz group, attracting very favorable reviews, playing at concerts and festivals in the USA and Europe, often in the company of Joe Henderson, playing a repertory of Hard-bop and modal-jazz pieces. Hubbard played at the legendary Monterey Jazz Festival in 1980 and in 1989 (with Bobby Hutcherson). He played with Woody Shaw, recording with him in 1985, and two years later recorded Stardust with Benny Golson. In 1988 he teamed up once more with Blakey at an engagement in Holland, from which came Feel the Wind. In 1990 he appeared in Japan headlining an American-Japanese concert package which also featured Elvin Jones, Sonny Fortune, pianists George Duke and Benny Green, bass players Ron Carter, and Rufus Reid, with jazz and vocalist Salena Jones. He also performed at the Warsaw Jazz Festival at which Live at the Warsaw Jazz Festival (Jazzmen 1992) was recorded.
Following a long setback of health problems and a serious lip injury in 1992 where he ruptured his upper lip and subsequently developed an infection, Hubbard was again playing and recording occasionally, even if not at the high level that he set for himself during his earlier career. His best records ranked with the finest in his field.
In 2006, The National Endowment for the Arts honored Hubbard with its highest honor in jazz, the NEA Jazz Masters Award.
On December 29, 2008, Hubbard's hometown newspaper, The Indianapolis Star reported that Hubbard died from complications from a heart attack suffered on November 26 of the same year.Billboard magazine reported that Hubbard died in Sherman Oaks, California.
Freddie Hubbard had close ties to the Jazz Foundation of America in his later years. Freddie is quoted as saying, “When I had congestive heart failure and couldn't work, The Jazz Foundation paid my mortgage for several months and saved my home! Thank God for those people."
The Jazz Foundation of America’s Musicians' Emergency Fund took care of Freddie during times of illness. After his passing Mr. Hubbard’s estate requested that tax deductible donations be made in Freddie’s name to The Jazz Foundation of America.


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Discography


As leader

  • Open Sesame (1960 , Blue Note)
  • Goin' Up (1960, Blue Note)
  • Minor Mishap(1961)
  • Hub Cap (1961,Blue Note)
  • Ready for Freddie (1961, Blue Note) Flac
  • The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard (1962 ,Impulse!)
  • Hub-Tones (1962,Blue Note)
  • Here to Stay (1962 ,Blue Note) 
  • The Body & the Soul (1963 ,Impulse!) 
  • Breaking Point (1964 ,Blue Note)
  • Blue Spirits (1965,Blue Note)
  • The Night of the Cookers (1965,Blue Note)
  • Jam Gems: Live at the Left Bank 2001 ,Label M)
  • Backlash (1966 ,Atlantic) 
  • High Blues Pressure (1968 ,Atlantic)
  • A Soul Experiment (1969,Atlantic)
  • Without a Song, Live in Europe (1969, Blue Note)
  • The Black Angel (1970, Atlantic)
  • The Hub of Hubbard (1970, MPS
  • Red Clay (1970 ,CTI) 
  • Straight Life (1970 ,CTI) 
  • Sing Me a Song of Songmy (1971 ,Atlantic)
  • First Light (1971 ,CTI) 
  • Sky Dive (1973, CTI)
  • Hot Horn (1973, Everest)
  • Freddie Hubbard/Stanley Turrentine In Concert Volume One (1974 ,CTI)
  • In Concert Volume Two (1974 ,CTI)
  • Keep Your Soul Together (1974 ,CTI)
  • High Energy (1974 ,Columbia)
  • Polar AC(1975,CTI)
  • Gleam (1975 ,Sony (Japan))
  • Liquid Love (1975,Columbia)
  • Windjammer (1976,Columbia) 
  • Bundle of Joy (1977 ,Columbia)
  • Super Blue (1978,Columbia) 
  • The Love Connection(1979,Columbia)
  • Freddie Hubbard Quintet Leon Thomas live at Onkel Pö s Carnegie Hall 1979
  • Skagly (1980, Columbia)
  • Live at the North Sea Jazz Festival(1980 ,Pablo)
  • Mistral with Art Pepper (1981 ,Liberty)
  • Outpost (1981 ,Enja)
  • Splash (1981,Fantasy)
  • Rollin'(1982 ,MPS)
  • Keystone Bop Vol. 2: Friday & Saturday (1996,Prestige)
  • Keystone Bop: Sunday Night (1982,Prestige)
  • Born to Be Blue (1982 ,Pablo) 
  • Ride Like the Wind (1982,Elektra/Asylum) 
  • Above & Beyond (1982 ,Metropolitan)
  • Back to Birdland (1982, Real Time)
  • Sweet Return (1983 ,Atlantic)
  • The Rose Tattoo (1983,Baystate (Japan)) 
  • Double Take with Woody Shaw (1985 ,Blue Note) 
  • Life Flight (1987, Blue Note)
  • The Eternal Triangle with Woody Shaw (1987 ,Blue Note) flac 1\ 2
  • Feel the Wind with Art Blakey (1988 ,Timeless)
  • Times are Changing (1989 ,Blue Note)
  • Topsy - Standard Book (1989,Alpha/Compose) 
  • Bolivia (1991,Music Masters)
  • At Jazz Jamboree Warszawa '91: A Tribute to Miles (2000 ,Starburst)
  • Live at Fat Tuesday's (1992,Music Masters)
  • Blues for Miles (1992, Evidence)
  • MMTC: Monk, Miles, Trane & Cannon (1995,Music Masters)
  • New Colors (2001,Hip Hop Essence) 
  • On The Real Side (70th Birthday Celebration) (2008,Times Square Records)
  • Pinnacle, Live And Unreleased From Keystone Korner (2011)

As sideman

  • Wes Montgomery - Fingerpickin' (1958)
  • John Coltrane – Stardust(1958)
  • Paul Chambers-Go (1959) 
  • Kenny Drew – Undercurrent(1960)
  • Hank Mobley – Roll Call(1960)
  • The J. J. Johnson Sextet - J. J. Inc. 1960 
  • Curtis Fuller - Boss Of The Soul Stream Trombone 1960
  • Ornette Coleman - Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation (1960)
  • Tina Brooks - True Blue (1960)
  • Eric Dolphy-Outward Bound (1960)
  • Slide Hampton Octet -Slide!(1961)
  • John Coltrane-Olé Coltrane (1961)
  • John Coltrane-Africa/Brass (1961)
  • Art Blakey-Mosaic (1961)
  • Art Blakey-Buhaina's Delight (1961)
  • A Jazz Hour with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers: Blues March (1961)
  • Jackie McLean-Bluesnik(1961)
  • Dexter Gordon - Doin Alright (1961)
  • Oliver Nelson - The Blues and the Abstract Truth (1961)
  • Duke Pearson – Dedication!(1961)
  • Bill Evans - Interplay (1962)
  • Curtis Fuller Soul Trombone 1962
  • Curtis Fuller - Cabin in the Sky (1962)
  • Art Blakey-Three Blind Mice (1962) 
  • Art Blakey-Caravan (1962)
  • Herbie Hancock-Takin' Off (1962)
  • Art Blakey-Ugetsu (1963)
  • Art Blakey- Free For All (1964)
  • Art Blakey-Kyoto (1964)
  • Eric Dolphy-Out to Lunch! (1964)
  • Herbie Hancock-Empyrean Isles (1964)
  • Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil (1964) Flac
  • John Coltrane-Ascension (1965)
  • Sam Rivers-Contours(1965)
  • Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue (1965)
  • Herbie Hancock-Maiden Voyage (1965)
  • Wayne Shorter - The Soothsayer(1965)
  • Wayne Shorter – The All Seeing Eye(1965)
  • Hank Mobley – The Turnaround(1965)
  • Sonny Rollins - East Broadway Run Down (1966)
  • Herbie Hancock-Blow-Up (Soundtrack) (1966)
  • Duke Pearson – Sweet Honey Bee(1966)
  • Duke Pearson – The Right Touch(1967)
  • Wes Montgomery - Road Song (1968)
  • George Benson - The Other Side of Abbey Road (1969)
  • Quincy Jones - Walking in Space (1969)
  • Leon Thomas - A Piece of Cake (Palcoscenico Records)
  • Stanley Turrentine - Sugar (1970)
  • Kenny Burrell - God Bless the Child (1971)
  • Dexter Gordon - Generation [1972]
  • Randy Weston - Blue Moses (1972)
  • Milt Jackson - Sunflower (1973)
  • Charles Earland - Leaving This Planet (1973)
  • Don Sebesky - Giant Box (1973)
  • Raul De Souza - Sweet Lucy (1977)
  • Herbie Hancock- VSOP: The Quintet (1977)
  • Herbie Hancock-VSOP: Tempest in the Colosseum (1977)
  • McCoy Tyner - Together (1978) flac
  • Billy Joel - 52nd Street (1978)
  • Herbie Hancock-VSOP: Live Under the Sky (1979)
  • George Cables - Cables' Vision (1979)
  • McCoy Tyner - Quartets 4 X 4 (1980) flac
  • C. Terry, Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie, O. Peterson - The Alternate Blues - 1980
  • The Trumpet Summit Meets The Oscar Peterson Big Four 1980
  • Oscar Peterson – Face to Face (1982) flac
  • Herbie Hancock-Round Midnight (Soundtrack) (1986)
  • Benny Golson, Freddie Hubbard - Stardust (1987)
  • Roberto Ávila & Sarava - Come to Brazil (1989)
  • Kirk Lightsey Trio - Temptation (1991)
  • Poncho Sanchez - Cambios (1991)
  • Stanley Turrentine – More Than a Mood(1992)
  • Joe Henderson-Big Band (1996)
  • Quincy Jones feat Tots Thielemans - I Never Told You (1998)

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Legend : Miles Davis




Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer.

Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. Many well-known musicians rose to prominence as members of Davis's ensembles, including saxophonists Gerry Mulligan, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, George Coleman, Wayne Shorter, and Kenny Garrett; trombonist J. J. Johnson; pianists Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett; guitarists John McLaughlin, John Scofield and Mike Stern; bassists Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, and Dave Holland; and drummers Tony Williams, Billy Cobham and Jack DeJohnette.

On October 7, 2008, his album Kind of Blue, released in 1959, received its fourth platinum certification from the RIAA, signifying sales of 4 million copies. Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006. Davis was noted as "one of the key figures in the history of jazz".

On November 5, 2009, Rep. John Conyers of Michigan sponsored a measure in the US House of Representatives to recognize and commemorate the album Kind of Blue on its 50th anniversary. The measure also affirms jazz as a national treasure and "encourages the United States government to preserve and advance the art form of jazz music."It passed, unanimously, with a vote of 409–0 on December 15, 2009.
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Studio albums
  • First Miles (1945)
  • Cool Boppin' (1948)
  • Birth of the Cool (1949 and 1950) 
  • ConceptiFon (1951)
  • Blue Period (1951)
  • Dig (1951)
  • Miles Davis and Horns (1951 )
  • Miles Davis Volume 1 (Blue Note Records, 1952 and 1954)
  • Miles Davis Volume 2 (Blue Note Records, 1953)
  • Blue Haze (1953 and 1954)
  • Collectors' Items (1953 and 1956)
  • Walkin' (1954)
  • Bags' Groove (1954)
  • Miles Davis and the Modern Jazz Giants (1954, with one track from 1956)
  • Musings of Miles (1955) 
  • Blue Moods (1955)
  • Quintet / Sextet (1955, Miles Davis and Milt Jackson)
  • Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet (1955)
  • Cookin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Relaxin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Workin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • Steamin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (1956)
  • 'Round About Midnight (1955-1956) 
  • Miles Ahead (1957)
  • Ascenseur pour l'Échafaud (Fontana Records, 1957 - film soundtrack)
  • Cannonball Adderley meets Miles Davis(1958)
  • Somethin' Else (Blue Note Records, 1958 - Cannonball Adderley quintet)
  • Milestones (1958)
  • Jazz Track (1958)
  • Porgy and Bess (1958)
  • 1958 Miles (1958)
  • Kind of Blue (1959
  • Sketches of Spain (1960) (RIAA: Gold)  
  • Someday My Prince Will Come (1961) 
  • Quiet Nights (1962-1963)
  • Seven Steps to Heaven (1963)
  • E.S.P (1965)
  • Miles Smiles (1966)
  • Sorcerer (1967
  • Nefertiti (1967)
  • Miles in the Sky (1968)
  • Filles de Kilimanjaro (1969 - 1968)
  • In a Silent Way (1969)
  • Bitches Brew (1970)
  • (A Tribute to) Jack Johnson (1970)
  • Live-Evil (1971 - 1970) 
  • On the Corner (1972)
  • Big Fun (1974_1969-1972) 
  • Get Up with It (1974 ) 
  • Water Babies (1976 - previously unissued recordings from 1967 & 1968)
  • Circle in the Round (1979 - previously unissued recordings from 1955-1970)
  • Directions (1981 -(1960-1970)) 
  • The Man With The Horn (1981)
  • Star People (1983)
  • Decoy (1984)
  • You're Under Arrest (1985)
  • Tutu (1986) 
  • Music from Siesta (1987 - film soundtrack)
  • Amandla (1989)
  • Aura (1989)
  • Dingo (1991 - film soundtrack)
  • Doo-Bop (1992) 

Live recordings

  • The Real Birth of the Cool (Miles’ nonet live at the Royal Roost) (1948)
  • Complete Birdland Recordings (1951-52)

  • Miles & Coltrane (1955)
  • Miles Davis Quintet at Peacock Alley (1956)
  • Amsterdam Concert (1957)
  • Miles Davis at Newport 1958 (1958)
  • Live in Den Haag (1960)
  • Miles Davis & John Coltrane. Live in Stockholm Live at the Konserthuset, Stockholm (1960)
  • Olympia, 20th March 1960 (1960)
  • Manchester Concert (1960) flac
  • Olympia, 11th October 1960 (1960)
  • Miles Davis At Carnegie Hall (1961)
  • Miles & Monk at Newport (1963 release of 1958 concert)
  • In Europe (1963)
  • Live at the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival (1963)
  • My Funny Valentine (1964)
  • Four & More (1964)
  • Miles In Tokyo (1964)
  • Miles In Berlin (1964)
  • The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965 (1965)
  • 1969 Miles Festival de Juan les Pins (1969)
  • Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970: It's About That Time (1970)
  • Black Beauty: Live at the Fillmore West (1970)
  • Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East (1970)
  • Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 (1970)
  • The Cellar Door Sessions (1970)
  • In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall (1972)
  • Jazz at the Plaza (1973 release of 1958 appearance)
  • Dark Magus (1974) disc 1 disc 2
  • Agharta (1975) altrn(Japan)
  • Pangaea (1975)
  • Miles! Miles! Miles! (1981)
  • We Want Miles (1982)
  • Munich Concert (1988) 1 \ 2 \ 3
  • The Complete Miles Davis at Montreux (1973-1991)
  • Miles & Quincy Live At Montreux (1991)
  • Live Around The World (1988-1991)
Box sets

  • The Complete Columbia Recordings of Miles Davis with John Coltrane (1955–1961)
  • Miles Davis & Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings (1957–1968)
  • Seven Steps: The Complete Columbia Recordings of Miles Davis 1963–1964 
  • The Complete Studio Recordings of The Miles Davis Quintet 1965–1968
  • The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions (1968–1969)
  • The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions (1969–1970)
  • The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions (1970)
  • The Complete On the Corner Sessions (1972–1975)
  • Miles Davis: The Complete Columbia Album Collection (1955-1985)
  • In Person Friday and Saturday Nights at the Blackhawk, Complete (1961)
  • The Complete Live Recordings 1948-1955 (10 CD Box 2006)
  • The Complete Prestige Recordings '51-'56 (8 Cd's box) - 1993
  • Young Miles 1945 -1950 [4CD Boxset](2001) 1 \ 2 \ 3 \ 4
  • The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions 16 Nov. '55-8 Dec.'56[4 Cd 's Box-Set 2006]

Friday, March 13, 2009

Sun Ra Discography

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This post is definitely going to be one of my favorite post I have done on Blax-Jive. Sun Ra is simply genius. His life is beyond music and deeper than what you may hear. I'm proud to make this post and I hope everyone take advantages of the selected biographies I will have listed. I am only going to post a summary of Sun Ra, but its much deeper than what I am posting.

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Sun Ra (May 22, 1914 to May 30, 1993) was an innovative and individual jazz composer, bandleader and piano and synthesizer player, who came to be known as much for preaching his bizarre cosmic philosophy as for his phenomenal musical compositions and performances.

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Born Herman "Sonny" Blount in Birmingham, Alabama, he abandoned his birth name and took on the name of Sun Ra (Ra being the name of the ancient Egyptian god of the Sun) and headed a band with an ever-changing ensemble known as the "Arkestra" (or sometimes "Solar Arkestra").

The musical development of Sun Ra can be (loosely) categorized into three periods:

The first period of the 1950s was when his music evolved from big-band Swing into the outer space-themed "cosmic jazz" he was best known for. Early inhis career, Ra worked as an arranger for Fletcher Henderson. Music critics and jazz historians say some of his best work was recorded during this period. Notable Sun Ra albums from the 1950s include Sun Ra Visits Planet Earth, Interstellar Low Ways, Angels And Demons At Play, We Travel The Spaceways, and Jazz In Silhouette (among many others).
It was during the 1950s that Sun Ra began wearing the outlandish, Egyptian-styled costumes and headdresses he would be known for. Claiming that he was not from the Planet Earth but rather from Saturn, Ra developed a complicated persona of "cosmic" philosophies and lyrical poetry that preached "awareness" and peace above all. He eschewed racism (having been a victim of it many times, in regards to the touring and booking schedule of the Arkestra), though he rarely came out and directly spoke about any controversial subjects. He preferred to make music, which he did, as the cast of musicians touring and working with him changed on an almost daily basis.
(The most notable graduate of the Sun Ra Arkestra was John Gilmore, a saxophonist whose work influenced that of John Coltrane).
During the 1960s, his music underwent a chaotic, free jazz experimental period. It was during this period that his popularity reached its peak, as the "beat generation" and the psychedelic era embraced him. In this era, Ra was among the first of any musicians to make extensive use of synthesizers and other various electronic instruments. Newcomers to Ra's music may have difficulty with his albums of this era. Notable titles from this period include The Magic City, When Sun Comes Out, The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra, Volume One and Other Planes Of There.
During their third period, beginning in the 1970s and onward, Sun Ra and the Arkestra settled down into a more conventional method (though still highly eclectic and energetic), and Ra took a liking to the films of Walt Disney. He incorporated smatterings of Disney's musical numbers into many of his performances from then on; and in the late 1980s the Arkestra even performed a concert at Walt Disney World. The Arkestra's version of "Pink Elephants on Parade" is available on Stay Awake, a compilation of Disney tunes by many artists.
A number of Sun Ra's 1970s concerts are available on CD, but none have received a wide release in comparison to his earlier music. The album Atlantis can be considered the landmark that led into his 1970s era.

During his career Sun Ra recorded over one hundred albums, but many of them were printed on microlabels, and his music was largely unknown outside of the live jazz touring circuit. In the 1990s, after he had left this plane of existence, many of his recordings were released on compact disc for the first time under the Ihnfinity Music label.

The Arkestra continues to tour and perform as of November 2003, now led by alto saxophonist Marshall Allen.

Sun Ra and his Arkestra were the subject of a documentary film made in 1972 and a feature film entitled Space Is The Place in 1974. The soundtrack, also by Sun Ra, is available on CD.

Some recommended albums (by no means all-inclusive): Atlantis, Supersonic Jazz, Cosmic Tones for Mental Therapy, We Travel the Spaceways, Singles, Languidity, The Magic City.








Brother From Another Planet [Documentary On Sun Ra]






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Albums

Read the companion guide to this thread by Jon-A at The Astro-Infinity Equation

Posthumous Releases

Two In One Albums

Live Bootlegs

Singles

Compilations

Mixtapes


Covers and Interpretations

Miscellaneous
Arkestra recordings without Sun Ra (post 1993)

Audio Interviews

Video


"Brother From Another Planet : The Sun Ra Story"

(2005, BBC documentary, 1.9.GB)

- text search "BBC" on the page.

"Space Is The Place"
(1972, released in 1974, 81 mins).


"Sun Ra - A Joyful Noise"
Documentary film by Robert Mugge (1980)

from Transparency DVD 0171
"Sun Ra Volume Two: Sun Ra Arkestra East and West Berlin"



Resources & Selected Biographies

Some notable sources & links :

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