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Showing posts with label Soul Jazz. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Soul Jazz. Show all posts

Friday, October 28, 2011

Nina Simone






Eunice Kathleen Waymon (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), better known by her stage name Nina Simone , was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music. Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.
Born the sixth child of a preacher's family in North Carolina, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist as a child. Her musical path changed direction after she was denied a scholarship to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, despite a well-received audition. Simone was later told by someone working at Curtis that she was rejected because she was black. She then began playing in a small club in Philadelphia to fund her continuing musical education to become a classical pianist and was required to sing as well. She was approached for a recording by Bethlehem Records, and her rendition of "I Loves You Porgy" became a smash hit in the United States in 1958. Over the length of her career, Simone recorded more than 40 albums, mostly between 1958 — when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue — and 1974.
Her musical style arose from a fusion of gospel and pop songs with classical music, in particular with influences from her first inspiration, Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied with her expressive jazz-like singing in her characteristic low tenor. She injected as much of her classical background into her music as possible to give it more depth and quality, as she felt that pop music was inferior to classical. Her intuitive grasp on the audience-performer relationship was gained from a unique background of playing piano accompaniment for church revivals and sermons regularly from the early age of six years.
After 20 years of performing, she became involved in the civil rights movement and the direction of her life shifted once again. Simone's music was highly influential in the fight for equal rights in the US
Simone was born Eunice Kathleen Waymon in Tryon, North Carolina. The sixth of eight children in a poor family, she began playing piano at age three; the first song she learned was "God Be With You, Till We Meet Again". Demonstrating a talent with the instrument, she performed at her local church, but her concert debut, a classical recital, was given when she was twelve. Simone later claimed that during this performance her parents, who had taken seats in the front row, were forced to move to the back of the hall to make way for white people. Simone said she refused to play until her parents were moved back to the front, and that the incident contributed to her later involvement in the civil rights movement.
Simone's mother, Mary Kate Waymon, was a strict Methodist minister and a housemaid. Simone's father, John Divine Waymon, was a handyman who at one time owned a dry cleaning business, but who also suffered bouts of ill health. Mary Kate's employer, hearing of her daughter's talent, provided funds for piano lessons. Subsequently, a local fund was set up to assist in Simone's continued education. With the assistance of this scholarship money she attended high school.
After finishing high school, she had studied for an interview with the help of a private tutor to study piano further at the Curtis Institute, but she was rejected. Simone believed that this rejection was related directly to her race. Simone then moved to New York City, where she studied at the Juilliard School of Music.
To fund her private lessons, Simone performed at the Midtown Bar & Grill on Pacific Avenue in Atlantic City, whose owner insisted that she sing as well as play the piano. In 1954 she adopted the stage name Nina Simone. "Nina" (from niña, meaning 'little girl' in Spanish) was a nickname a boyfriend had given to her, and "Simone" was taken from the French actress Simone Signoret, whom she had seen in the movie Casque d'or. Simone's mixture of jazz, blues, and classical music in her performances at the bar earned her a small, but loyal, fan base.
In 1958, she befriended and married Don Ross, a beatnik who worked as a fairground barker, but quickly regretted their marriage. After playing in small clubs, in 1958 she recorded a rendition of George Gershwin's "I Loves You Porgy" (from Porgy and Bess), which she learned from a Billie Holiday album and performed as a favor to a friend. It became her only Billboard top 40 success in the United States, and her debut album Little Girl Blue soon followed on Bethlehem Records. Simone missed out on more than $1 million in royalties (mainly because of the successful re-release of My Baby Just Cares for Me during the 1980s) and never benefited financially from the album, because she had sold her rights to it for $3,000.
After the success of Little Girl Blue, Simone signed a contract with Colpix Records, and recorded a string of studio and live albums. Colpix relinquished all creative control to her, including the choice of material that would be recorded, in exchange for her signing the contract with them. At this point, Simone only performed pop music to make money to continue her classical music studies, and was indifferent about having a recording contract. She kept this attitude toward the record industry for most of her career.
Simone married a New York police detective, Andrew Stroud, in 1961; Stroud later became her manager
In 1964, she changed record distributors, from the American Colpix to the Dutch Philips, which also meant a change in the contents of her recordings. Simone had always included songs in her repertoire that drew upon her African-American origins (such as "Brown Baby" and "Zungo" on Nina at the Village Gate in 1962). On her debut album for Philips, Nina Simone In Concert (live recording, 1964), however, Simone for the first time openly addressed the racial inequality that was prevalent in the United States with the song "Mississippi Goddam", her response to the murder of Medgar Evers and the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four black children. The song was released as a single, and it was boycotted in certain southern states. "Old Jim Crow", on the same album, addressed the Jim Crow Laws.
From then on, a civil rights message was standard in Simone's recording repertoire, becoming a part of her live performances. Simone performed and spoke at many civil rights meetings, such as at the Selma to Montgomery marches.Simone advocated violent revolution during the civil rights period, rather than Martin Luther King's non-violent approach, and she hoped that African Americans could, by armed combat, form a separate state. Nevertheless, she wrote in her autobiography that she and her family regarded all races as equal.
She covered Billie Holiday's "Strange Fruit", a song about the lynching of black men in the South, on Pastel Blues (1965). She also sang the W. Cuney poem "Images" on Let It All Out (1966), about the absence of pride she saw among African-American women. Simone wrote "Four Women", a song about four different stereotypes of African-American women, and included the recording on her 1966 album Wild Is the Wind.
Simone moved from Philips to RCA Victor during 1967. She sang "Backlash Blues", written by her friend Langston Hughes on her first RCA album, Nina Simone Sings The Blues (1967). On Silk & Soul (1967), she recorded Billy Taylor's "I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free" and "Turning Point". The album Nuff Said (1968) contains live recordings from the Westbury Music Fair, April 7, 1968, three days after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. She dedicated the whole performance to him and sang "Why? (The King Of Love Is Dead)", a song written by her bass player, Gene Taylor, directly after the news of King's death had reached them. In the summer of 1969 she performed at the Harlem Cultural Festival in Harlem's Mount Morris Park.
Together with Weldon Irvine, Simone turned the late Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished play To Be Young, Gifted, and Black into a civil rights song. Hansberry had been a personal friend whom Simone credited with cultivating her social and political consciousness. She performed the song live on the album Black Gold (1970). A studio recording was released as a single, and renditions of the song have been recorded by Aretha Franklin (on her 1972 album Young, Gifted and Black) and by Donny Hathaway.
Simone left the United States in September 1970, flying to Barbados and expecting Stroud to communicate with her when she had to perform again. However, Stroud interpreted Simone's sudden disappearance, and the fact that she had left behind her wedding ring, as an indication of a desire for a divorce. As her manager, Stroud was in charge of Simone's income.
When Simone returned to the United States she learned that a warrant had been issued for her arrest for unpaid taxes (as a protest against her country's involvement with the Vietnam War), causing her to return to Barbados again to evade the authorities and prosecution.Simone stayed in Barbados for quite some time and she had a lengthy affair with the Prime Minister, Errol Barrow.[[25] A close friend, singer Miriam Makeba, then persuaded her to go to Liberia. After that she lived in Switzerland and the Netherlands, before settling in France during 1992.
She recorded her last album for RCA Records, It Is Finished, during 1974. Simone did not make another record until 1978, when she was persuaded to go into the recording studio by CTI Records owner Creed Taylor. The result was the album Baltimore, which, while not a commercial success, did get good reviews and marked a quiet artistic renaissance in Simone's recording output. Her choice of material retained its eclecticism, ranging from spiritual songs to Hall & Oates' "Rich Girl". Four years later Simone recorded Fodder On My Wings on a French label. During the 1980s Simone performed regularly at Ronnie Scott's jazz club in London, where she recorded the album Live at Ronnie Scott's in 1984. Although her early on-stage style could be somewhat haughty and aloof, in later years, Simone particularly seemed to enjoy engaging her audiences sometimes by recounting humorous anecdotes related to her career and music and by soliciting requests. In 1987, the original 1958 recording of "My Baby Just Cares For Me" was used in a commercial for Chanel No. 5 perfume in the United Kingdom. This led to a re-release of the recording, which stormed to number 4 on the UK's NME singles chart, giving her a brief surge in popularity in the UK. Her autobiography, I Put a Spell on You, was published in 1992. She recorded her last album, A Single Woman, in 1993.
In 1993, Simone settled near Aix-en-Provence in Southern France. She had suffered from breast cancer for several years before she died in her sleep at her home in Carry-le-Rouet, Bouches-du-Rhône on April 21, 2003. (In addition, Simone received a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in the late 1980s. Her funeral service was attended by singers Miriam Makeba and Patti Labelle, poet Sonia Sanchez, actor Ossie Davis, and hundreds of others. Elton John sent a floral tribute with the message "You were the greatest and I love you".[ Simone's ashes were scattered in several African countries. She left behind a daughter, Lisa Celeste Stroud, an actress and singer, who took the stage name Simone, and has appeared on Broadway in Aida.

Discography(Studio&Lives):



1958 Little Girl Blue (Studio) Bethlehem Records part 1 part 2
1959 Nina Simone and Her Friends (Studio) Bethlehem Records
1959 The Amazing Nina Simone (Studio) Colpix Records altrn
1959 Nina Simone at Town Hall (Live and studio) Colpix Records altrn
1960 Nina Simone at Newport (Live) Colpix Records part 1 part 2
1960 Forbidden Fruit (Studio) Colpix Records
1962 Nina at the Village Gate (Live) Colpix Records part 1 part 2
1962 Nina Simone Sings Ellington (Live) Colpix Records
1963 Nina Simone at Carnegie Hall (Live) Colpix Records
1964 Folksy Nina (Live) Colpix Records
1964 Nina Simone in Concert (Live) Philips Records altrn
1964 Broadway-Blues-Ballads (Studio) Philips Records altrn
1965 I Put a Spell on You (Studio) Philips Records
1965 Pastel Blues (Studio) Philips Records altrn
1966 Nina Simone with Strings (Studio) (strings added) Colpix
1966 Let It All Out (Live and studio) Philips
1966 Wild Is the Wind (Studio) Philips
1967 High Priestess of Soul (Studio) Philips
1967 Nina Simone Sings the Blues (Studio) RCA Records
1967 Silk & Soul (Studio) RCA Records altrn
1968 Nuff Said (Live and studio) RCA Records
1969 Nina Simone and Piano (Studio) RCA Records
1969 To Love Somebody (Studio) RCA Records
1970 Black Gold (Live) RCA Records
1971 Here Comes the Sun (Studio) RCA Records
1972 Emergency Ward (Live and Studio) RCA Records altrn
1974 It Is Finished (Live) RCA Records
1978 Baltimore (Studio) CTI Records
1982 Fodder on My Wings (Studio) Carrere
1984 Backlash (Live) StarJazz
1985 Nina's Back (Studio) VPI
1985 Live & Kickin (Live) VPI
1987 Let It Be Me (Live) Verve
1987 Live at Ronnie Scott's (Live) Hendring-Wadham
1993 A Single Woman
(Studio) Elektra Records


Compilation:

2000 The Essential Nina Simone" (compilation, RCA, ) FLAC



Monday, August 15, 2011

Dr. Lonnie Smith

Dr. Lonnie Smith (born July 3, 1942 in Lackawanna, New York) is a jazz Hammond B3 organist and pianist.

He was born in Lackawanna, New York, into a family with a vocal group and radio program. Smith says that his mother was a major influence on him musically, as she introduced him to gospel, classical, and jazz music. He was part of several vocal ensembles in the 1950s, including the Teen Kings. Art Kubera, the owner of a local music store, gave Smith his first organ, a Hammond B3.
Smith's affinity for R&B melded with his own personal style as he became active in the local music scene. He moved to New York City, where he met George Benson, the guitarist for Jack McDuff's band. Benson and Smith connected on a personal level, and the two formed the George Benson Quartet, featuring Lonnie Smith, in 1966.
After two albums under Benson's leadership, It's Uptown and Cookbook, Smith recorded his first solo album (Finger Lickin' Good) in 1967, with George Benson and Melvin Sparks on guitar, Ronnie Cuber on baritone sax, and Marion Booker on drums. This combination remained stable for the next five years.
After recording several albums with Benson, Smith became a solo recording artist and has since recorded over 30 albums under his own name. Numerous prominent jazz artists have joined Smith on his albums and in his live performances, including Lee Morgan, David "Fathead" Newman, King Curtis, Terry Bradds, Blue Mitchell, and Joe Lovano.
In 1967, Smith met Lou Donaldson, who put him in contact with Blue Note Records. Donaldson asked the quartet to record an album for Blue Note, Alligator Bogaloo. Blue Note signed Smith for the next four albums, all in the soul jazz style, including Think (with Melvin Sparks, Marion Booker, Lee Morgan and David Newman) and Turning Point (with Lee Morgan, Bennie Maupin, Melvin Sparks and Idris Muhammad).
Smith's next album Move Your Hand was recorded at the Club Harlem in Atlantic City, New Jersey in August 1969. The album's reception allowed his reputation to grow beyond the Northeast. He would record another studio album Drives and one more live album Live at Club Mozambique (recorded in Detroit on May 21, 1970) before leaving Blue Note.
In the mid-1970s, Dr. Lonnie Smith converted to Sikhism. Smith has also been referred to from around that time as "Dr. Lonnie Smith" although the honorific does not represent an academic doctorate degree.
Smith toured the northeastern United States heavily during the 1970s. He concentrated largely on smaller neighborhood venues during this period. His sidemen included Ronnie Cuber, Dave Hubbard, Bill Easley and George Adams on sax, Donald Hahn on trumpet, George Benson and Larry McGee on guitars, and Joe Dukes, Sylvester Goshay, Phillip Terrell, Marion Booker, Jimmy Lovelace, Charles Crosby, Art Gore, Norman Connors and Bobby Durham on drums.
Smith has performed at several prominent jazz festivals with artists including Grover Washington, Jr., Ron Carter, Dizzy Gillespie, Lou Donaldson and Ron Holloway. He has also played with musicians outside of jazz, such as Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight, Etta James, Joan Cartwright, and Esther Phillips.
He was named the "Organ Keyboardist of the Year" in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2008, and 2009 by the Jazz Journalist Association.


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Discography

as a lider
1968: Think! (Blue Note)
1969: Turning Point (Blue Note)
1970: Drives (Blue Note)
1970: Live at Club Mozambique (Blue Note)
1971: Mama Wailer (Kudu)
1975: When the Night is Right! (Chiaroscuro)
1975: Afrodesia (Groove Merchant)
1976: Keep on Lovin' (Groove Merchant)
1977: Funk Reaction
1978: Gotcha (TK) 
1993: Afro Blue (Music Masters) part 1 \ part 2
1994: Foxy Lady: a Tribute to Hendrix (Music Masters)
2000: The Turbanator (32 Jazz)
2003: Boogaloo to Beck: A Tribute (Scufflin')
2004: Too Damn Hot (Palmetto)
2006: Jungle Soul (Palmetto)
2009: Rise Up! (Palmetto)
2010: Spiral (Palmetto)

as a sideman

1965:Red Holloway - Red Soul
1988:Jimmy Ponder - To Reach A Dream part1 \ part2
1993:Lou Donaldson - Caracas 
1994:Lou Donaldson - Sentimental Journey
1996:Essence All Stars - Organic Grooves 
1998-Ximo Tebar - Goes Blue
1999:Jimmy McGriff - McGriff's House Party
2000:Bobby Broom - Modern Man
2003:Crash - The Doctor Is In
2007:Saori Yano - Little Tiny


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Dr. Lonnie Smith discography at dougpayne.com



Sunday, January 30, 2011

Legendary Bobbi Humphrey



Biography

Bobbi Humphrey is a jazz flautist whose musical tastes lean toward fusion and smooth jazz-pop. From the outset of her career, Humphrey was quite popular, winning a large crossover audience with her pop-oriented jazz-fusion. Throughout her career, her popularity exceeded her critical acclaim, but she received high marks for her technique and showmanship. Audiences stayed with Humphrey for decades, buying her records and attending her concerts from the Montreux Festival to Carnegie Hall.

Although Bobbi Humphrey was born in Marlin, TX, she was raised in Dallas. She began playing flute in high school and continued her studies at Texas Southern University and Southern Methodist University. Dizzy Gillespie saw Humphrey play at a talent contest at Southern Methodist and, impressed with what he had heard, he urged her to pursue a musical career in New York City. She followed through on his advice, getting her first big break performing at the Apollo Theater on amateur night. Shortly afterward, she began playing regularly throughout the city, including a gig with Duke Ellington.

Humphrey signed with Blue Note in 1971. Her smooth blend of jazz, funk, pop, and R&B fit in well with the new sound of Blue Note, and her six albums for the label -- Flute In, Dig This, Blacks and Blues, Satin Doll, Live at Montreux, and Fancy Dancer -- were all successes. In particular, 1973's Blacks and Blues was a rousing success, earning her a crossover pop and R&B audience. That same year, she played the Montreux Festival in Switzerland. In 1976, she was named Best Female Instrumentalist by Billboard. The following year, she switched record labels, signing with Epic and releasing Tailor Made that same year. She also played on Stevie Wonder's platinum album Songs in the Key of Life in 1977.

Tailor Made was the first of three albums for Epic Records; Freestyle followed in 1978 and The Good Life appeared about a year afterward. During the '80s, Humphrey continued to perform regularly, even if she didn't record often. She returned to recording in 1989, releasing City Beat on Malaco Records. Five years later, Passion Flute appeared on her own Paradise Sounds label, where she is President and C.E.O.


Discography

  • 1972 Dig This
  • 1972 Flute In
  • 1973 Live at Montreux
  • 1974 Blacks and Blues
  • 1975 Satin Doll
  • 1975 Fancy Dancer
  • 1977 Tailor Made
  • 1978 Freestyle
  • 1979 The Good Life
  • 1982-90 Rare Singles
  • 1989 City Beat
  • 1994 Passion Flute
  • 1998 Blue Breakbeats

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Freddie Hubbard



Frederick Dewayne "Freddie" Hubbard
(April 7, 1938 – December 29, 2008) was an American jazz trumpeter. He was known primarily for playing in the bebop, hard bop and post bop styles from the early 1960s and on. His unmistakable and influential tone contributed to new perspectives for modern jazz and bebop.

Hubbard started playing the mellophone and trumpet in his school band, studying at the Jordan Conservatory with the principal trumpeter of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. In his teens Hubbard worked locally with brothers Wes and Monk Montgomery and worked with bassist Larry Ridley and saxophonist James Spaulding. In 1958, at the age of 20, he moved to New York, and began playing with some of the best jazz players of the era, including Philly Joe Jones, Sonny Rollins, Slide Hampton, Eric Dolphy, J. J. Johnson, and Quincy Jones. In June 1960 Hubbard made his first record as a leader, Open Sesame, with saxophonist Tina Brooks, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Clifford Jarvis.
In December 1960, Hubbard was invited to play on Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz after Coleman had heard him playing with Don Cherry.
Then in May 1961, Hubbard played on Olé Coltrane, John Coltrane's final recording session with Atlantic Records. Together with Eric Dolphy, Hubbard was the only 'session' musician who appeared on both Olé and Africa/Brass, Coltrane's first album with ABC/Impulse! Later, in August 1961, Hubbard made one of his most famous records, Ready for Freddie, which was also his first collaboration with saxophonist Wayne Shorter. Hubbard joined Shorter later in 1961 when he replaced Lee Morgan in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. He played on several Blakey recordings, including Caravan, Ugetsu, Mosaic, and Free For All. Hubbard remained with Blakey until 1966, leaving to form the first of several small groups of his own, which featured, among others, pianist Kenny Barron and drummer Louis Hayes.
It was during this time that he began to develop his own sound, distancing himself from the early influences of Clifford Brown and Morgan, and won the Downbeat jazz magazine "New Star" award on trumpet.
Throughout the 1960s Hubbard played as a sideman on some of the most important albums from that era, including, Oliver Nelson's The Blues and the Abstract Truth, Eric Dolphy's Out to Lunch, Herbie Hancock's Maiden Voyage, and Wayne Shorter's Speak No Evil. He recorded extensively for Blue Note Records in the 1960s: eight albums as a bandleader, and twenty-eight as a sideman. Hubbard was described as "the most brilliant trumpeter of a generation of musicians who stand with one foot in 'tonal' jazz and the other in the atonal camp". Though he never fully embraced the free jazz of the '60s, he appeared on two of its landmark albums: Coleman's Free Jazz and Coltrane's Ascension.
Hubbard achieved his greatest popular success in the 1970s with a series of albums for Creed Taylor and his record label CTI Records, overshadowing Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws, and George Benson.. Although his early 1970s jazz albums Red Clay, First Light, Straight Life, and Sky Dive were particularly well received and considered among his best work, the albums he recorded later in the decade were attacked by critics for their commercialism. First Light won a 1972 Grammy Award and included pianists Herbie Hancock and Richard Wyands, guitarists Eric Gale and George Benson, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, and percussionist Airto Moreira. In 1994, Freddie, collaborating with Chicago jazz vocalist/co-writer Catherine Whitney, had lyrics set to the music of First Light.
In 1977 Hubbard joined with Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Ron Carter and Wayne Shorter, members of the mid-sixties Miles Davis Quintet, for a series of performances. Several live recordings of this group were released as VSOP, VSOP: The Quintet, VSOP: Tempest in the Colosseum (all 1977) and VSOP: Live Under the Sky (1979).
Hubbard's trumpet playing was featured on the track Zanzibar, on the 1978 Billy Joel album 52nd Street (the 1979 Grammy Award Winner for Best Album). The track ends with a fade during Hubbard's performance. An "unfaded" version was released on the 2004 Billy Joel box set My Lives.
In the 1980s Hubbard was again leading his own jazz group, attracting very favorable reviews, playing at concerts and festivals in the USA and Europe, often in the company of Joe Henderson, playing a repertory of Hard-bop and modal-jazz pieces. Hubbard played at the legendary Monterey Jazz Festival in 1980 and in 1989 (with Bobby Hutcherson). He played with Woody Shaw, recording with him in 1985, and two years later recorded Stardust with Benny Golson. In 1988 he teamed up once more with Blakey at an engagement in Holland, from which came Feel the Wind. In 1990 he appeared in Japan headlining an American-Japanese concert package which also featured Elvin Jones, Sonny Fortune, pianists George Duke and Benny Green, bass players Ron Carter, and Rufus Reid, with jazz and vocalist Salena Jones. He also performed at the Warsaw Jazz Festival at which Live at the Warsaw Jazz Festival (Jazzmen 1992) was recorded.
Following a long setback of health problems and a serious lip injury in 1992 where he ruptured his upper lip and subsequently developed an infection, Hubbard was again playing and recording occasionally, even if not at the high level that he set for himself during his earlier career. His best records ranked with the finest in his field.
In 2006, The National Endowment for the Arts honored Hubbard with its highest honor in jazz, the NEA Jazz Masters Award.
On December 29, 2008, Hubbard's hometown newspaper, The Indianapolis Star reported that Hubbard died from complications from a heart attack suffered on November 26 of the same year.Billboard magazine reported that Hubbard died in Sherman Oaks, California.
Freddie Hubbard had close ties to the Jazz Foundation of America in his later years. Freddie is quoted as saying, “When I had congestive heart failure and couldn't work, The Jazz Foundation paid my mortgage for several months and saved my home! Thank God for those people."
The Jazz Foundation of America’s Musicians' Emergency Fund took care of Freddie during times of illness. After his passing Mr. Hubbard’s estate requested that tax deductible donations be made in Freddie’s name to The Jazz Foundation of America.


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Discography


As leader

  • Open Sesame (1960 , Blue Note)
  • Goin' Up (1960, Blue Note)
  • Minor Mishap(1961)
  • Hub Cap (1961,Blue Note)
  • Ready for Freddie (1961, Blue Note) Flac
  • The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard (1962 ,Impulse!)
  • Hub-Tones (1962,Blue Note)
  • Here to Stay (1962 ,Blue Note) 
  • The Body & the Soul (1963 ,Impulse!) 
  • Breaking Point (1964 ,Blue Note)
  • Blue Spirits (1965,Blue Note)
  • The Night of the Cookers (1965,Blue Note)
  • Jam Gems: Live at the Left Bank 2001 ,Label M)
  • Backlash (1966 ,Atlantic) 
  • High Blues Pressure (1968 ,Atlantic)
  • A Soul Experiment (1969,Atlantic)
  • Without a Song, Live in Europe (1969, Blue Note)
  • The Black Angel (1970, Atlantic)
  • The Hub of Hubbard (1970, MPS
  • Red Clay (1970 ,CTI) 
  • Straight Life (1970 ,CTI) 
  • Sing Me a Song of Songmy (1971 ,Atlantic)
  • First Light (1971 ,CTI) 
  • Sky Dive (1973, CTI)
  • Hot Horn (1973, Everest)
  • Freddie Hubbard/Stanley Turrentine In Concert Volume One (1974 ,CTI)
  • In Concert Volume Two (1974 ,CTI)
  • Keep Your Soul Together (1974 ,CTI)
  • High Energy (1974 ,Columbia)
  • Polar AC(1975,CTI)
  • Gleam (1975 ,Sony (Japan))
  • Liquid Love (1975,Columbia)
  • Windjammer (1976,Columbia) 
  • Bundle of Joy (1977 ,Columbia)
  • Super Blue (1978,Columbia) 
  • The Love Connection(1979,Columbia)
  • Freddie Hubbard Quintet Leon Thomas live at Onkel Pö s Carnegie Hall 1979
  • Skagly (1980, Columbia)
  • Live at the North Sea Jazz Festival(1980 ,Pablo)
  • Mistral with Art Pepper (1981 ,Liberty)
  • Outpost (1981 ,Enja)
  • Splash (1981,Fantasy)
  • Rollin'(1982 ,MPS)
  • Keystone Bop Vol. 2: Friday & Saturday (1996,Prestige)
  • Keystone Bop: Sunday Night (1982,Prestige)
  • Born to Be Blue (1982 ,Pablo) 
  • Ride Like the Wind (1982,Elektra/Asylum) 
  • Above & Beyond (1982 ,Metropolitan)
  • Back to Birdland (1982, Real Time)
  • Sweet Return (1983 ,Atlantic)
  • The Rose Tattoo (1983,Baystate (Japan)) 
  • Double Take with Woody Shaw (1985 ,Blue Note) 
  • Life Flight (1987, Blue Note)
  • The Eternal Triangle with Woody Shaw (1987 ,Blue Note) flac 1\ 2
  • Feel the Wind with Art Blakey (1988 ,Timeless)
  • Times are Changing (1989 ,Blue Note)
  • Topsy - Standard Book (1989,Alpha/Compose) 
  • Bolivia (1991,Music Masters)
  • At Jazz Jamboree Warszawa '91: A Tribute to Miles (2000 ,Starburst)
  • Live at Fat Tuesday's (1992,Music Masters)
  • Blues for Miles (1992, Evidence)
  • MMTC: Monk, Miles, Trane & Cannon (1995,Music Masters)
  • New Colors (2001,Hip Hop Essence) 
  • On The Real Side (70th Birthday Celebration) (2008,Times Square Records)
  • Pinnacle, Live And Unreleased From Keystone Korner (2011)

As sideman

  • Wes Montgomery - Fingerpickin' (1958)
  • John Coltrane – Stardust(1958)
  • Paul Chambers-Go (1959) 
  • Kenny Drew – Undercurrent(1960)
  • Hank Mobley – Roll Call(1960)
  • The J. J. Johnson Sextet - J. J. Inc. 1960 
  • Curtis Fuller - Boss Of The Soul Stream Trombone 1960
  • Ornette Coleman - Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation (1960)
  • Tina Brooks - True Blue (1960)
  • Eric Dolphy-Outward Bound (1960)
  • Slide Hampton Octet -Slide!(1961)
  • John Coltrane-Olé Coltrane (1961)
  • John Coltrane-Africa/Brass (1961)
  • Art Blakey-Mosaic (1961)
  • Art Blakey-Buhaina's Delight (1961)
  • A Jazz Hour with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers: Blues March (1961)
  • Jackie McLean-Bluesnik(1961)
  • Dexter Gordon - Doin Alright (1961)
  • Oliver Nelson - The Blues and the Abstract Truth (1961)
  • Duke Pearson – Dedication!(1961)
  • Bill Evans - Interplay (1962)
  • Curtis Fuller Soul Trombone 1962
  • Curtis Fuller - Cabin in the Sky (1962)
  • Art Blakey-Three Blind Mice (1962) 
  • Art Blakey-Caravan (1962)
  • Herbie Hancock-Takin' Off (1962)
  • Art Blakey-Ugetsu (1963)
  • Art Blakey- Free For All (1964)
  • Art Blakey-Kyoto (1964)
  • Eric Dolphy-Out to Lunch! (1964)
  • Herbie Hancock-Empyrean Isles (1964)
  • Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil (1964) Flac
  • John Coltrane-Ascension (1965)
  • Sam Rivers-Contours(1965)
  • Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue (1965)
  • Herbie Hancock-Maiden Voyage (1965)
  • Wayne Shorter - The Soothsayer(1965)
  • Wayne Shorter – The All Seeing Eye(1965)
  • Hank Mobley – The Turnaround(1965)
  • Sonny Rollins - East Broadway Run Down (1966)
  • Herbie Hancock-Blow-Up (Soundtrack) (1966)
  • Duke Pearson – Sweet Honey Bee(1966)
  • Duke Pearson – The Right Touch(1967)
  • Wes Montgomery - Road Song (1968)
  • George Benson - The Other Side of Abbey Road (1969)
  • Quincy Jones - Walking in Space (1969)
  • Leon Thomas - A Piece of Cake (Palcoscenico Records)
  • Stanley Turrentine - Sugar (1970)
  • Kenny Burrell - God Bless the Child (1971)
  • Dexter Gordon - Generation [1972]
  • Randy Weston - Blue Moses (1972)
  • Milt Jackson - Sunflower (1973)
  • Charles Earland - Leaving This Planet (1973)
  • Don Sebesky - Giant Box (1973)
  • Raul De Souza - Sweet Lucy (1977)
  • Herbie Hancock- VSOP: The Quintet (1977)
  • Herbie Hancock-VSOP: Tempest in the Colosseum (1977)
  • McCoy Tyner - Together (1978) flac
  • Billy Joel - 52nd Street (1978)
  • Herbie Hancock-VSOP: Live Under the Sky (1979)
  • George Cables - Cables' Vision (1979)
  • McCoy Tyner - Quartets 4 X 4 (1980) flac
  • C. Terry, Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie, O. Peterson - The Alternate Blues - 1980
  • The Trumpet Summit Meets The Oscar Peterson Big Four 1980
  • Oscar Peterson – Face to Face (1982) flac
  • Herbie Hancock-Round Midnight (Soundtrack) (1986)
  • Benny Golson, Freddie Hubbard - Stardust (1987)
  • Roberto Ávila & Sarava - Come to Brazil (1989)
  • Kirk Lightsey Trio - Temptation (1991)
  • Poncho Sanchez - Cambios (1991)
  • Stanley Turrentine – More Than a Mood(1992)
  • Joe Henderson-Big Band (1996)
  • Quincy Jones feat Tots Thielemans - I Never Told You (1998)

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Legend: Idris Muhammad



Idris Muhammad (born November 13, 1939 in New Orleans, Louisiana; is a jazz drummer. He was born Leo Morris on November 13, 1939 before changing his name in the 1960s upon his conversion to Islam. He is known for his funky playing style. He has released a number of albums as leader, and has played with a number of jazz legends including Lou Donaldson, Johnny Griffin, Pharoah Sanders and Grover Washington, Jr. He has been touring and recording with pianist Ahmad Jamal since 1995. At 15 years-old, one of Muhammad's earliest recorded sessions as a drummer was on Fats Domino's 1956 smash hit Blueberry Hill.

In 1966, he married Dolores "LaLa" Brooks (former member of the Crystals; she converted to Islam with him and went for a time under the name Sakinah Muhammad). They separated in 1999. Together, they have two sons and two daughters. Muhammad is an endorser of Istanbul Agop Cymbals who issued a 22" Idris Muhammad Signature Ride in at the 2008 NAMM show in Anaheim, CA.

Discography:

As leader
  • 1970: Black Rhythm Revolution (Prestige Records) Flac
  • 1971: Peace & Rhythm (Prestige) Flac
  • 1974: Power of Soul
  • 1976: House of the Rising Sun
  • 1977: Turn This Mutha Out
  • 1978: Boogie to the Top
  • 1978: You Ain't No Friend of Mine 
  • 1979: Fox Huntin'
  • 1980: Kabsha
  • 1980: Make It Count
  • 1992: My Turn
  • 1996:Legends of Acid Jazz
  • 1998: Right Now
As sideman
  • With Pharoah Sanders
  • Jewels of Thought(1969)
  • Journey to the One (1980)
  • Shukuru (1981)
  • Heart Is a Melody(1982)
  • Africa(1987)
  • With Nat Adderley
  • * Calling Out Loud (CTI, 1968)
  • With Lou Donaldson
  • * Fried Buzzard (Cadet, 1965)
  • * Blowing in the Wind (Cadet, 1966)
  • * Lou Donaldson At His Best (Cadet, 1966)
  • * Alligator Bogaloo (Blue Note, 1967)
  • * Mr. Shing-A-Ling (Blue Note, 1967)
  • * Midnight Creeper (Blue Note, 1968)
  • * Say It Loud! (Blue Note, 1968)
  • * Hot Dog (Blue Note, 1969)
  • * Everything I Play is Funky (Blue Note, 1970)
  • * Pretty Things (Blue Note, 1970)
  • * The Scorpion (Blue Note, 1970)
  • * Cosmos (Blue Note 1971)
  • * Sweet Poppa Lou (Muse, 1981)
  • With Grant Green
  • * Sookie Sookie (Blue Breakbeats 1998)
  • With Freddie Hubbard
  • * New Colors (Hip Bop Essence 2001) \ FLAC
  • With Ahmad Jamal
  • * The Essence of Ahmad Jamal, Pt 1 (1994) pass = yuforum\ FLAC
  • * Big Byrd: The Essence, Pt. 2 (Dreyfus, 1997) pass = yuforum
  • * Nature: The Essence, Part III (Dreyfus, 1998)pass = yuforum
  • * Picture Perfect (2000)
  • * Ahmad Jamal 70th Birthday (2000)
  • * In Search of Momentum (Dreyfus, 2002)
  • * After Fajr (Dreyfus, 2005) \ Flac
  • * It's Magic (Dreyfus, 2008)
  • With Rodney Jones
  • * Soul Manifesto (1991)
  • With Ernest Ranglin
  • * Below the Bassline (Island Records, 1998)
  • With John Scofield
  • * Groove Elation (1995)
  • With Leon Spencer
  • * Sneak Preview (Prestige Records, 1970)
  • * Louisiana Slim (Prestige, 1971)
  • With Stanley Turrentine
  • Common Touch(1968)
  • Sugar Man(1975)
  • With Andrew Hill
  • Grass Roots!(1968)
  • With Charles Earland
  • Black Talk!(1969)
  • With Reuben Wilson
  • Love Bug (1969)
  • With Lonnie Smith
  • Turning Point(1969)
  • With Sonny Stitt
  • Goin' Down Slow (1971)
  • With Gene Ammons
  • My Way (1970)
  • With Bob James
  • 1965: Explosions
  • 2003 - The Legendary Albums
  • With Roberta Flack
  • Feel Like Makin' Love (1975)
  • Blue Lights in the Basement(1977)
  • With Merry Clayton
  • Keep Your Eye on the Sparrow (1975)
  • With Gabor Szabo
  • Macho(1975)
  • With Allspice
  • Allspice(1977)
  • With Richard "Groove" Holmes
  • Groove's Groove(1977)
  • Good Vibrations (1977)
  • With David "Fathead" Newman
  • Back to Basics (1977)
  • Concrete Jungle(1977)
  • Keep the Dream Alive(1977)
  • With Dexter Wansel
  • What the World Is Coming To(1977)
  • With Wilbert Longmire
  • Champagne(1979)
  • With Johnny Lytle
  • Fast Hands(1980)
  • Good Vibes(1981)
  • With Ximo Tebar
  • The Champs(2004)
  • With Horace Silver
  • That Healin' Feelin(1970)
  • With Bobbi Humphrey
  • Flute In (1971)
  • With Rusty Bryant
  • Soul Liberation(1970)
  • Fire Eater (1971)
  • With Melvin Sparks
  • Akilah(1973)
  • With Willis "Gator" Jackson,
  • Bar Wars(1977) \ APE
  • Single Action(1978)
  • With Etta Jones
  • My Mother's Eyes(1977)
  • With Randy Weston
  • Portraits of Thelonious Monk(1990,Verve)






Sunday, March 7, 2010

Legend:Ramsey Emmanuel Lewis



Ramsey Emmanuel Lewis, Jr. (born May 27, 1935) is an American jazz composer, pianist and radio personality. He has been referred to as "the great performer",a title reflectin g his performance style and musical selections which display his early gospel playing and classical training (Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, etc.) along with his love of jazz and other musical forms. Ramsey Lewis has recorded over 80 albums and has received five gold records and three Grammy Awards so far in his career.

Ramsey Lewis was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Ramsey Lewis, Sr. and Pauline Lewis. Lewis began taking piano lessons at the age of four. At 15 he joined his first jazz band, The Cleffs. The seven-piece group provided Lewis his first involvement with jazz; he would later join Cleffs drummer Isaac "Redd" Holt and bassist Eldee Young to form the Ramsey Lewis Trio. He has a grandson, named Ramsey Lewis who lives in California, but used to attend your local high school in Chicago's Northside.

The trio started as primarily a jazz unit and released their first album, Ramsey Lewis And The Gentlemen of Swing, in 1956. Following their 1965 hit The In Crowd (the single reached #5 on the pop charts, and the album #2) they concentrated more on pop material. Young and Holt left in 1966 to form the Young-Holt Trio and were replaced by Cleveland Eaton and Maurice White. White was replaced by Maurice Jennings in 1970. Later, Franky Donaldson and Billy "The Bhudda" Dickens replaced Jennings and Eaton; Felton Crews also appeared on many 1980's releases.

By 1966, Lewis was one of the nation’s most successful jazz pianists, topping the charts with The In Crowd, Hang On Sloopy, and Wade in the Water. Many of his recordings attracted a large non-jazz audience. In the '70s, Lewis often played electric piano, although by later in the decade he was sticking to acoustic and using an additional keyboardist in his groups.

In addition to recording and performing, Lewis hosted a morning show on Chicago "smooth jazz" radio station WNUA (95.5 FM) until May 22, 2009. His weekly syndicated radio program Legends of Jazz, created in 1990, features recordings from artists such as David Sanborn, George Duke, Herbie Hancock, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Kurt Elling, Al Jarreau and Miles Davis. The show can be heard in 60 U.S. cities and overseas. On December 4, 2006, the Ramsey Lewis Morning Show became part of Broadcast Architecture's Smooth Jazz Network, simulcasting on other Smooth Jazz stations across the country for the first time. However, the show was still based in Chicago until it was cancelled when WNUA switched over to a Spanish format.

In 2006, a well-received 13-episode Legends of Jazz television series hosted by Lewis was broadcast on public TV nationwide and featured live performances by a variety of jazz artists including Larry Gray, Lonnie Smith, Joey Defrancesco, Dave Brubeck, Chick Corea, Kurt Elling, Benny Golson, Pat Metheny and Tony Bennett.

Lewis is artistic director of Jazz at Ravinia (an annual feature at the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, Illinois) and helped organize Ravinia's Jazz Mentor Program. Ramsey also serves on the Board of Trustees for the Merit School of Music, a Chicago inner-city music program and The Chicago High School for the Arts, the new public arts high school in Chicago. Early in 2005, the Ramsey Lewis Foundation was created to help connect at-risk children to the world of music. As an offshoot of that foundation, Lewis plans to form a Youth Choir and Youth Orchestra. In January 2007, the Dave Brubeck Institute invited Lewis to join its Honorary Board of Friends at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. Lewis is an Honorary Board member of the Chicago Jazz Orchestra. Lewis is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. In May 2008, Lewis received an honorary doctorate from Loyola University Chicago upon delivering the keynote address at the undergraduate commencement ceremony.

Lewis still lives in Chicago, Illinois, the city of his musical roots. He has seven children, fourteen grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

*************************************************************************************

Discography
As A Sideman:


Max Roach – Art Blakey – Percussion Discussion (Appr. 1957) (Chess)
Max Roach - Max (1958)


Video:

Legends of Jazz: Showcase (with Ramsey Lewis).(2006)
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